The story of Vito Russo, founding father of the gay liberation movement, author of "The Celluloid Closet," and vociferous AIDS activist in the 1980s.

Director:

Jeffrey Schwarz
Reviews
5 wins & 4 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Phyllis Antonellis Phyllis Antonellis ... Self - Cousin
George Bancroft ... Bill Bailey
Richard Barrios Richard Barrios ... Self
Edmund Bergler Edmund Bergler ... Self - Psychoanalyst, Writer (archive footage) (as Edmund Bergler M.D.)
Richard Berkowitz Richard Berkowitz ... Self - Author
Lenny Bloom Lenny Bloom ... Self - Friend & Lawyer (as Leonard Bloom)
Jay Blotcher Jay Blotcher ... Self
Malcolm Boyd Malcolm Boyd ... Self (as Reverend Malcolm Boyd)
Stephen Boyd ... Messala
Joseph Brewer Joseph Brewer ... Self
Lee Brewster Lee Brewster ... Self - Queens Liberation Front (archive footage)
Tom Brokaw ... Self (archive footage)
Billie Burke ... Glinda
Marcus A. Conant Marcus A. Conant ... Self (archive footage)
Jane Darwell ... Mrs. Winchell - Jack's Mother
Edit

Storyline

In the aftermath of Stonewall, a newly politicized Vito Russo found his voice as a gay activist and critic of LGBT representation in the media. He went on to write "The Celluloid Closet," the first book to critique Hollywood's portrayals of gays on screen. During the AIDS crisis in the 1980s, Vito became a passionate advocate for justice via the newly formed ACT UP, before his death in 1990. Written by Anonymous

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Jede Revolution Braucht Eine Stimme! (German) See more »


Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Arnie Kantrowitz is listed two different ways on screen, first as "Friend," and second as "Vice President, Gay Activists Alliance." See more »

Connections

Features Red River (1948) See more »

Soundtracks

Friends
Written by Buzzy Linhart and Mark Klingman
Performed by Bette Midler
See more »

User Reviews

 
A good documentary.
25 July 2012 | by krachtmSee all my reviews

I had never heard of Vito Russo before I watched this documentary, which makes me feel a bit bad. He was highly influential in both the gay rights and AIDS awareness campaigns, eventually dying of AIDS-related complications in 1990.

I have to admit, I was a little bit worried that the documentary would be too niche for me to enjoy. I had just watched a documentary about bird watchers in Central Park, and that had been a bit boring. So, when I saw that this was about a gay rights activist, I was a little skeptical that it might interest me, even though I'm a big supporter. It turns out that this is actually quite well done, with some interesting interviews and enough information that people like me can understand the importance and influence of Vito Russo.

As the documentary went on, I found myself more and more impressed with Russo, agreeing with him quite often. It would have been interesting to see what he thought of Clinton and his "don't ask, don't tell" policy. I have a feeling that Russo would have blasted Clinton for that. Unfortunately, we'll never know.

While not quite as good as Crumb or King of Kong, this is still a good documentary, and I can readily recommend it to anyone, as long as they're not homophobic. Russo was a progressive, so his politics may alienate Republicans, but I doubt that many of them are going to be watching this, anyway.


5 of 5 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 6 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

14 October 2011 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Na gej heroj - Vito See more »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Color:

Color | Black and White (film excerpts)
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed