5.7/10
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568 user 463 critic

Only God Forgives (2013)

Trailer
1:26 | Trailer
Julian, a drug-smuggler thriving in Bangkok's criminal underworld, sees his life get even more complicated when his mother compels him to find and kill whoever is responsible for his brother's recent death.
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Popularity
2,499 ( 406)
14 wins & 20 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Ryan Gosling ... Julian
Kristin Scott Thomas ... Crystal
Vithaya Pansringarm ... Chang
Gordon Brown Gordon Brown ... Gordon
Yayaying Rhatha Phongam ... Mai
Tom Burke ... Billy
Sahajak Boonthanakit ... Kim
Pitchawat Petchayahon Pitchawat Petchayahon ... Phaiban
Charlie Ruedpokanon ... Daeng
Kowit Wattanakul Kowit Wattanakul ... Choi Yan Lee (as Kovit Wattanakul)
Wannisa Peungpa Wannisa Peungpa ... Kanita
Narucha Chaimareung Narucha Chaimareung ... Papa San
Danai Thiengdham Danai Thiengdham ... Waiter / Li Po
Wittchuta Watjanarat Wittchuta Watjanarat ... Ma Fong
Nophand Boonyai Nophand Boonyai ... Charlie Ling
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Storyline

Bangkok. Ten years ago Julian (Ryan Gosling) killed a man and went on the run. Now he manages a Thai boxing club as a front for a drugs operation. Respected in the criminal underworld, deep inside, he feels empty. When Julian's brother murders an underage prostitute, the Police call on retired cop Chang (Vithaya Pansringarm) - the Angel of Vengeance. Chang allows the father to kill his daughter's murderer, then "restores order" by chopping off the man's right hand. Julian's mother Crystal (Dame Kristin Scott Thomas) - the head of a powerful criminal organization - arrives in Bangkok to collect her son's body. She dispatches Julian to find his killers and "raise Hell".

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Time to Meet The Devil

Genres:

Action | Crime | Drama

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong bloody violence including grisly images, sexual content and language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The film was booed at Cannes film festival. See more »

Goofs

After the fight of the opening scene, the arm of the winner is raised by the referee and the defeated fighter is picked up by his helpers in blue. When the camera cuts to the other side of the ring, this is shown again. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Julien: [in Thai] Go.
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Connections

References Nightmare (1981) See more »

Soundtracks

Lume Mai Long
("Can't Forget")
Lyric/Melody by Samneang Thongmoung
Performed by Vithaya Pansringarm
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User Reviews

 
Red and blue cocoon of irrelevance
21 May 2014 | by p-stepienSee all my reviews

Hot of the heels of his breakthrough to the big league, Danish director Nicholas Winding Refn delivers a vivid pastel of imagery firmly situated on top of a self-flagellating revenge flick, which makes Johnnie To look like Akira Kurosawa. When Billy (Tom Burke), one of two brothers leading a drug trafficking ring and muay-thai fighting arena, haplessly decides to go on a hunt to rape and kill a underage prostitute, he is soon exacted punishment through the actions of police lieutenant Chang (Vithaya Pansringarm). This in turn brings about a spiralling circle of violence, when their mother Crystal (Kristin Scott Thomas) attempts to induce vengeful retribution on those responsible, despite the half-hearted opposition of the quietly numb younger sibling Julian (an ever-distant Ryan Gosling).

With "Drive" as a reference point, Refn seemingly intended to push the envelope further down the road, replacing the withdrawn anti-hero with a tirade of depraved villains, offering only two characters: Chang and Julian any sort of moral code, however skewed and lopsided it may be. This essentially makes neither the story nor the characters relatable in the slightest, making the almost oniric film language painted with red and blue (to an extreme not ventured into since the glory days of Dario Argento) a distanced voyage into a dark fable of gloom and doom. Depending on your taste buds this is undoubtedly a hit-and-miss type of movie, easily attention grabbing with its artsy endeavour in bloody circles of violence, but lacking essential movie meat underneath the skinned body. As such it can be admired for its crazed trippiness or for the beautiful suddenness of splattered carcasses.

This beautiful cocoon of irrelevance is essentially good viewing, but despite its adventurous experimentation it still seemed overly derivative of Hong Kong, Korean or other East Asian revenge dramas. Nonetheless Refn boldly borrows aesthetics and even some concepts or specific scenes, successfully transposing the language into a Western- made movie (a success in itself) without a hint of pastiche or reverence. From a filmmaking point of view a success, but with characters so detached from viewer interest it comes off more as a failed experiment into the formation of an alternative 'non-hero' protagonist.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

Denmark | France | USA | Sweden | Belgium

Language:

English | Thai

Release Date:

22 May 2013 (France) See more »

Also Known As:

Only God Forgives See more »

Filming Locations:

Bangkok, Thailand See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$4,800,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$313,958, 21 July 2013

Gross USA:

$779,188

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$10,639,616
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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