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Midnight in Paris (2011)

PG-13 | | Comedy, Fantasy, Romance | 10 June 2011 (USA)
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2:04 | Trailer
While on a trip to Paris with his fiancée's family, a nostalgic screenwriter finds himself mysteriously going back to the 1920s every day at midnight.

Director:

Woody Allen

Writer:

Woody Allen
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Popularity
877 ( 337)
Won 1 Oscar. Another 25 wins & 102 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Owen Wilson ... Gil
Rachel McAdams ... Inez
Kurt Fuller ... John
Mimi Kennedy ... Helen
Michael Sheen ... Paul
Nina Arianda ... Carol
Carla Bruni ... Museum Guide
Maurice Sonnenberg Maurice Sonnenberg ... Man at Wine Tasting
Thierry Hancisse ... 1920's Partygoer
Guillaume Gouix ... 1920's Partygoer
Audrey Fleurot ... 1920's Partygoer
Marie-Sohna Condé Marie-Sohna Condé ... 1920's Partygoer (as Marie-Sohne Condé)
Yves Heck ... Cole Porter
Alison Pill ... Zelda Fitzgerald
Tom Hiddleston ... F. Scott Fitzgerald
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Storyline

Gil and Inez travel to Paris as a tag-along vacation on her parents' business trip. Gil is a successful Hollywood writer but is struggling on his first novel. He falls in love with the city and thinks he and Inez should move there after they get married, but Inez does not share his romantic notions of the city or the idea that the 1920s were the golden age. When Inez goes off dancing with her friends, Gil takes a walk at midnight and discovers what could be the ultimate source of inspiration for writing. Gil's daily walks at midnight in Paris could take him closer to the heart of the city but further from the woman he's about to marry. Written by napierslogs

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for some sexual references and smoking | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Did You Know?

Trivia

Probably inspired by the Moberly-Jourdain incident in 1901 in which two academics, Charlotte Anne Moberly and Eleanor Jourdain, claimed to have experienced a timeslip into pre-revolutionary France on the grounds of Versailles. See more »

Goofs

Four minutes in, as Gil and Inez talk over the opening credits, Rachel McAdams's Canadian accent is very audible when she says "What's wonderful *about* getting wet?" (This is shortly before Inez says she could never live outside the USA.) See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Gil: This is unbelievable! Look at this! There's no city like this in the world. There never was.
Inez: You act like you've never been here before.
Gil: I don't get here often enough, that's the problem. Can you picture how drop dead gorgeous this city is in the rain? Imagine this town in the '20s. Paris in the '20s, in the rain. The artists and writers!
Inez: Why does every city have to be in the rain? What's wonderful about getting wet?
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Connections

Featured in Ebert Presents: At the Movies: Episode #1.21 (2011) See more »

Soundtracks

Ain't She Sweet
Composed by Milton Ager & Jack Yellen
© WB Music Corp.
Used by permission of Edwin H. Morris & Company
A division of MPL Music Publishing, Inc.
Performed by Enoch Light & The Charleston City All Stars
Courtesy of Geffen Records
Under license from Universal Music Enterprises
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User Reviews

It Glows.... Literally
7 November 2011 | by marielaperezsimonsSee all my reviews

All men fear death. It's a natural fear that consumes us all," says a character in "Midnight in Paris"… "However, when you make love with a truly great woman, one that deserves the utmost respect in this world and one that makes you feel truly powerful, that fear of death completely disappears." Paris is her name. She has seduced writers for centuries, and in "Midnight in Paris" writer/director Woody Allen makes love to her with his camera, in the most poetic of ways.  Or perhaps he's referring to art, to achieving such intimacy with your craft and such artistic climax that you become immortal, like Hemingway, Matisse, Fitzgerald, Picasso, Dali, or Allen himself.

Gil Pender, the protagonist in Allen's new film, has never experienced that kind of artistic height. Played quite convincingly by Owen Wilson (in a surprising and refreshing role that Allen had to re-write for him), Gil is an aspiring novelist who is visiting Paris with his girlfriend (Rachel McAdams) and her parents. But while they prefer to shop and visit museums, Gil chooses to wonder about. "No work of art can compare to a city," he says.

Pender is actually mesmerized by the City of Lights and fantasizes about what he believes was Paris' Golden Age, the 1920s with the Lost Generation of American writers walking its streets, writing in sidewalk cafés, and frequenting smoky bars and flamboyant parties. One evening at midnight, trying to find his way back to the hotel, something magical happens to Gil. Really! But no reviewer should give that magic away.

Getting lost in the city seems to be a symbol for how lost he really is, as a person and as a writer, and although he's somewhat insecure and anxious (he even carries a bottle of Valium with him), he's actually a likable guy and soon meets a few bohemian friends (played by Marion Cotillard, Kathy Bates, Adrien Brody, among others) who give him much-needed advice about life and the creative process.   From the beginning, "Midnight in Paris" grabs you with its witty and sophisticated dialogue about art, culture and literature, and in the second half the dialogue gets even better. For instance, my favorite line comes from one of the bohemian characters, who believes that: "the job of the artist is not to succumb to despair but to find an antidote for the emptiness of existence." Another piece of wisdom comes from one of the antagonists who criticizes Gil for being infatuated with the past: "Nostalgia is denial … a flaw in the romantic imagination of people who find it difficult to cope with the present." Think about that one while watching the film, for I believe, there lies the moral of this fabulous fable about the past and the present.

At age 75—with more than 40 films under his belt—Allen has created a film that literally glows. Its dazzling cinematography, inventive plot, and Parisian score, combined with the top-notch acting and set-design, makes for an almost-perfect film, one that's not only clever and thought-provoking, but also entertaining and accessible—even to mainstream audiences


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Details

Country:

Spain | USA | France

Language:

English | French | Spanish | German

Release Date:

10 June 2011 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Midnight in Paris See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$17,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$599,003, 22 May 2011

Gross USA:

$56,817,045

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$153,959,590
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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