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Slack Bay Review

Author: Stefan Pape

Bruno Dumont has been behind several profound, bleak dramas across his career, culminating in his most recent directorial outing Camille Claudel 1915. Yet the Frenchman now returns to the silver screen with a playful, farcical endeavour that is stylistic in a comparable way to the films of Wes Anderson. But fear not, the filmmaker maintains his dark edge, similarly, in that regard, to British sitcom The League of Gentleman. Though a hybrid between the two, it’s hard not to feel such a description oversells this endeavour somewhat, as while an indelible cinematic experience, it’s undoubtedly a flawed one.

Set in the summer of 1910, we delve into the lives of two socially contrasting families in a small beachside resort. There are the affluent, extravagant Van Peteghem’s, a group of degenerates visiting their holiday home, with André (Fabrice Luchini) and Aude (Juliette Binoche) getting unwittingly caught
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Trailer Watch: “Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc” Is a Musical Ode to Martyrdom

“Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc”

Chances are you’ve heard of Joan of Arc — the famous martyr and feminist icon who disguised herself as a man in order to fight in the Hundred Years’ War and was eventually burned at the stake for it. And you probably wouldn’t associate the so-called Maid of Orléans’ story with whimsy. But that might change after watching the trailer for “Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc.”

From writer-director Bruno Dumont (“Camille Claudel 1915”), “Jeanette” is a musical reimagining of Joan of Arc as a child and young adult. Jeanette (Lise Leplat Prudhomme), as she’s called, is trying to make sense of the constant war and suffering that surrounds her. Through song, we see her form her own opinions about the war, devote herself to her faith, and receive her calling.

“After I raise the seige and save the Duke of Orléans, I’ll have the Dauphin crowned in the cathedral at Reims,” a teenage Jeannette (Jeanne Voisin) declares to a friend.

“The Lord told you that himself?” he quips back.

“No,” she replies, dead serious. “He sent Saint Michel, Saint Catherine, and Saint Marquerite.”

The French film features catchy original music from heavy metal artist Igorrr and choreography by Philippe Decoufle. There are even nuns doing the can-can and saints doing the Swim. Martyrdom never looked this fun.

For another depiction of unconventional nuns, you may want to check out “The Little Hours,” out June 30. Alison Brie, Aubrey Plaza, and Kate Micucci play medieval nuns who are sick of a life of poverty, chastity, and obedience. Especially chastity.

“Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc” will premiere at Cannes’ Directors Fortnight on May 21.

https://medium.com/media/aedd1dbdb2ac0b931f85f2390e31db56/href

Trailer Watch: “Jeanette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc” Is a Musical Ode to Martyrdom was originally published in Women and Hollywood on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.
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Going beyond by Anne-Katrin Titze

Fabrice Luchini, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Lauréna Thellier, Juliette Binoche, Raph, Manon Royère as the Van Peteghems in Bruno Dumont's wild Slack Bay (Ma Loute)

"I think each one of us has in us both some Brufort (Thierry Lavieville and Brandon Lavieville) and some Van Peteghem (see photo above)."

Bruno Dumont's latest, the musical Jeannette, L'Enfance De Jeanne d'Arc, will screen at the Cannes Film Festival where his Li'l Quinquin and Slack Bay (Ma Loute) had their world premieres. In our conversation the director/screenwriter discussed the character of the brother, Paul Claudel (Jean-Luc Vincent) in Camille Claudel 1915, the lens of the grotesque, pushing the grandparents in Li'l Quinquin to go beyond what is expected and how "grace is really within the reach of all of us."

Bruno Dumont on Camille Claudel 1915: "I think for me, using the grotesque, it's almost as though it were a lens.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Bruno Dumont musical to screen in Cannes by Anne-Katrin Titze - 2017-05-07 17:35:36

Fabrice Luchini, Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Lauréna Thellier, Juliette Binoche, Raph, Manon Royère as the Van Peteghems in Bruno Dumont's wild Slack Bay (Ma Loute)

"I think each one of us has in us both some Brufort (Thierry Lavieville and Brandon Lavieville) and some Van Peteghem (see photo above)."

Bruno Dumont's latest, the musical Jeannette, L'Enfance De Jeanne d'Arc, will screen at the Cannes Film Festival where his Li'l Quinquin and Slack Bay (Ma Loute) had their world premieres. In our conversation the director/screenwriter discussed the character of the brother, Paul Claudel (Jean-Luc Vincent) in Camille Claudel 1915, the lens of the grotesque, pushing the grandparents in Li'l Quinquin to go beyond what is expected and how "grace is really within the reach of all of us."

Ma Loute (Brandon Lavieville) and Billie (Raph), police inspectors Machin (Didier Després) and Malfoy (Cyril Rigaux)

When tourists start to disappear
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Getting physical with language by Anne-Katrin Titze

Bruno Dumont talks Ma Loute and his Cannes musical Jeannette l'enfance de Jeanne d'Arc with Anne-Katrin Titze Photo: Ellen Sowchek

Bruno Dumont's cathartic and fearlessly comical journey Slack Bay (Ma Loute) stars an expressive Fabrice Luchini, a daring Juliette Binoche, and a blushing Valeria Bruni Tedeschi with Raph, a bit reminiscent of Katharine Hepburn in George Cukor's Sylvia Scarlett, an eternal Thierry Lavieville, Jean-Luc Vincent ("We know what to do, but we do not do"), a fascinated Brandon Lavieville, and the Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy-like duo Cyril Rigaux and Didier Després.

The Van Peteghems - André (Fabrice Luchini), Aude (Juliette Binoche), Billie (Raph): "You know, the way Juliette behaves, it's almost as though she is laughing at herself."

The Camille Claudel 1915 and Li'l Quinquin director's latest film Jeannette l'enfance de Jeanne d'Arc (Jeannette: The Childhood of Joan of Arc), based on a text by Charles Péguy,
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

Juliette Binoche Keeps Risking It All: The Guiding Principles That Lead Her From Hollywood to ‘Slack Bay’

Juliette Binoche Keeps Risking It All: The Guiding Principles That Lead Her From Hollywood to ‘Slack Bay’
What brings one of the most acclaimed French actresses in the world to a Hollywood blockbuster? It’s a question that’s hard to avoid when thinking about Juliette Binoche. The Oscar winner has been a muse for Olivier Assayas, Abbas Kiarostami and Michael Haneke. She’s worked with Jean-Luc Godard, Leos Carax and Krzysztof Kieślowski. And yet, rather strangely, she has popped up in American tentpoles like “Godzilla” and “Ghost in the Shell” in recent years.

Read More: Review: Bruno Dumont’s ‘Slack Bay’ is a Middle Finger to French Society

If you think Hollywood money is the draw, then you simply don’t know Binoche. The actress could’ve gone blockbuster 24 years ago when Steven Spielberg pursued her for “Jurassic Park.” She turned him down to work with Kieślowski on “Three Colours: Blue.” Spielberg would cast Laura Dern. Binoche would win the César Award for Best Actress. Denying
See full article at Indiewire »

Review: Arthouse Pratfalls—Bruno Dumont's "Slack Bay"

  • MUBI
Bruno Dumont pushed himself as a filmmaker with his comic detective miniseries P’tit Quinquin (2014), and now he seems to have confirmed this new direction for the cinema with Slack Bay, a pratfall-filled coastal tale of crime and love set in the 1910s. The crime is missing tourists in a poor seaside village on Côte d'Opale; the investigators a blimp-sized local detective and his pint-sized sidekick; and the love is between a local boy and a cross-dressing young beauty of a rich family whose gratuitously Egyptian-style mansion sits sentinel over the titular marshy bay.In this far-flung location the French director ambitiously expands his experiment begun with his first period film, Camille Claudel 1915 (2013), where his preferred cast of non-professional locals—including, in that film, those with mental disabilities—acted alongside mega-star Juliette Binoche. In Slack Bay, Binoche returns as a rich flit and mother of the romantic youth of ambiguous gender,
See full article at MUBI »

Juliette Binoche Re-enters the Eccentric World of Bruno Dumont in U.S. Trailer for ‘Slack Bay’

Following his epic drama Li’l Quinquin — which he is currently prepping a sequel to — director Bruno Dumont returned to Cannes last year with Slack Bay, a dark period comedy following an investigation into a series of mysterious disappearances on the beaches of northern France. Led by his Camille Claudel star Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini, and Valeria Bruni Tedeschi, Kino Lorber picked it up for a U.S. release later this spring, and now a new trailer has arrived.

We said in our review from Cannes last year, “The most important innovation, and also this film’s greatest weakness, is its focus on an upper-class family played by well-known actors. Dumont has long proven his aptitude for working with non-professional performers, and his only collaboration with a major star to date, Juliette Binoche in Camille Claudel 1915, turned out just as fruitfully.”

Check out the new trailer and poster below.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Memento sells Cannes award-winner 'The Salesman' to UK, Germany

Memento sells Cannes award-winner 'The Salesman' to UK, Germany
Exclusive: Memento also secures deals for Bruno Dumont’s Cannes contender Slack Bay.

The UK’s Curzon Artificial Eye and Germany’s Prokino are among the latest distributors to snap up Iranian director Asghar Farhadi’s The Salesman (Forushande) following its well-received premiere in Competition at Cannes this year.

Farhadi’s tale about a couple in a touring production of Arthur Miller’s Death Of A Salesman whose relationship turns violent picked up awards for best screenplay as well as best actor for Shahab Hosseini.

Paris-based Memento Films International (Mfi) has also unveiled new deals to Bulgaria (Bulgaria Film Vision), Czech Republic and Slovakia (Artcam) and Romania (Macondo).

The title also sold well into Latin America during Cannes, securing distribution in Argentina (Alfa Films), Brazil (Providence Filmes) and Mexico (Cinema Nueva Era). Bogota-based Cineplex took rights for Colombia, Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia and Central America as well as pan-Latin American satellite TV rights.

There were also
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Sharmill Films picks up Juliette Binoche-starrer Slack Bay out of Cannes

Juliette Binoche in Slack Bay.

Sharmill Films has acquired Bruno Dumont.s Slack Bay (Ma Loute), starring Juliette Binoche, out of Cannes.

Slack Bay premiered in official competition, and is about the disappearances of tourists from a picturesque coastal community in the north of France in 1910, and the increasingly bizarre behaviour of the local townsfolk.

Binoche co-stars with Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni Tedeschi.

Dumont's credits include L'il Quinquin, Camille Claudel 1915 and Hors Satan.

The film received mixed reviews at Cannes, with THR's Todd McCarthy calling it "arresting".and The Telegraph's Tim Robey labelling the film "hard to swallow".

Slack Bay's rural period setting and its apparently idiosyncratic, darkly comic tone would suggest that Sharmill are shooting for The Dressmaker crowd, with Binoche subbing in for Kate Winslet.

No release date has yet been set.
See full article at IF.com.au »

Cannes 2016. Bruno Dumont's "Slack Bay"

Bruno Dumont pushed himself as a filmmaker for his comic detective miniseries P’tit Quinquin, and now he seems to have confirmed this new direction for the cinema with Slack Bay, a pratfall-filled coastal tale of crime and love set in the 1910s. The crime is missing tourists in a poor seaside village on Côte d'Opale; the investigators a blimp-sized local detective and his pint-sized sidekick; the love between a local boy and a cross-dressing young beauty of a rich family whose gratuitously Egyptian-style mansion sits sentinel over the titular marshy bay.The French director ambitiously expands his experiment begun with his first period film, Camille Claudel 1915, where his preferred cast of non-professional locals, including those with mental disabilities, acted alongside mega-star Juliette Binoche. In Slack Bay, Binoche returns as a rich flit and mother of a romantic youth of ambiguous gender, alongside Valeria Bruni Tedeschi and Fabrice Luchini
See full article at MUBI »

[Cannes Review] Slack Bay

More than a few eyebrows were raised two years ago when it was announced that the next outing by Bruno Dumont, dour auteur extraordinaire, would be a comedy. But then Li’l Quinquin screened in the Director’s Fortnight and blew everyone away, eventually coming to top Cahiers du Cinéma’s list of the year’s best films. Not only was the four-part miniseries (or four-hour film, per Cahiers) side-splittingly funny, but, surprisingly, it also made perfect sense as a Dumont film. The genre volte-face didn’t require the director to venture into unknown territory — he simply had to push his signature sternness even further to render it hilariously absurd. Hopes were therefore high for Slack Bay, which sees him continue in the same vein. Disappointingly, the film feels like someone trying very hard to imitate Li’l Quinquin, pulling off but a pallid counterfeit.

Dumont constructs most of Slack
See full article at The Film Stage »

Cannes: Kino Lorber picks up 'Slack Bay'

  • ScreenDaily
Cannes: Kino Lorber picks up 'Slack Bay'
The distributor has pounced on all North American rights to Bruno Dumont’s Cannes competition selection and upcoming world premiere.

Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi star in the drama produced by 3B Productions and co-produced by Arte French Cinema, Pictanovo, Twenty Twenty Vision in association with Cnc, Canal +, Arte/Wdr and Region Nord Pas de Calais.

Slack Bay takes place in summer 1910 as a pair of inspectors investigate a case of missing tourists on the Channel coast, near a community of fishermen and oyster farmers where a love story plays out between two notorious families.

The film will mark Dumont’s third to premiere in competition on the Croisette. He has previously won grand prix for Humanité and Flanders.

CEO Richard Lorber negotiated the deal with Tanja Meissner, head of sales at worldwide sales agent Memento Films International.

Kino Lorber has collaborated with Dumont on the release of Humanité and Flanders, as well as
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Kino Lorber picks up 'Slack Bay'

  • ScreenDaily
Kino Lorber picks up 'Slack Bay'
The distributor has pounced on all North American rights to Bruno Dumont’s Cannes competition selection and upcoming world premiere.

Juliette Binoche, Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi star in the drama produced by 3B Productions and co-produced by Arte French Cinema, Pictanovo, Twenty Twenty Vision in association with Cnc, Canal +, Arte/Wdr and Region Nord Pas de Calais.

Slack Bay takes place in summer 1910 as a pair of inspectors investigate a case of missing tourists on the Channel coast, near a community of fishermen and oyster farmers where a love story plays out between two notorious families.

The film will mark Dumont’s third to premiere in competition on the Croisette. He has previously won grand prix for Humanité and Flanders.

CEO Richard Lorber negotiated the deal with Tanja Meissner, head of sales at worldwide sales agent Memento Films International.

Kino Lorber has collaborated with Dumont on the release of Humanité and Flanders, as well as
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Why France's god of grim made a knockabout Clouseau-style comedy

Bruno Dumont is famed for making relentlessly grim films that show the savage side of humanity. So why has he shot a knockabout comedy about a buffoonish cop? The French director explains how P’tit Quinquin came about – and why he has no regrets about casting a gardener who refused to learn his lines

I’m a little apprehensive about telling Bruno Dumont how funny I found his new film P’tit Quinquin. I half-expect him to bristle like Joe Pesci in GoodFellas: “Funny how? You think I’m here to amuse you?” After all, the French writer-director is legendary for the severity of his films and of his own sometimes taciturn manner. His work – from his 1997 debut La Vie de Jésus to the harrowing artist biopic Camille Claudel 1915 – characteristically portrays the bleaker corners of the human condition in a filmic language that can be dauntingly austere. The
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

No Disappearing Act: Bruno Dumont & Juliette Binoche Re-Team on “Slack Bay”

Bruno Dumont is set to continue his fixation for the nineteen-tens as Screen Daily has confirmed that filmmaker will indeed reteam with his Camille Claudel 1915 thesp Juliette Binoche on his eighth feature film. Fabrice Luchini and Valeria Bruni Tedeschi will also star in Slack Bay (Ma Loute), which is due to shoot this summer in northern France (here is a pic of the spatial lieu). Memento Films International will be selling the project in Cannes next month. It’ll likely be among the Cannes contenders for the following year.

Gist: Set in 1910, this unfolds against the backdrop of an area along the northern French coast known as La Slack , after a local river that only flows into the sea at high tide. Following the mysterious disappearance of several tourists as they relax on the bay’s beautiful beaches, famous inspectors Machin and Malfoy are called in to investigate. Their
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Stockfish to open with Blowfly Park

  • ScreenDaily
Stockfish to open with Blowfly Park
First edition of the new Icelandic film festival to open with award-winning actor Sverrir Gudnason in attendance.

The inaugural Stockfish Film Festival (Feb 19-March 1), launched by a group of industry veterans, is to kick off in Iceland with Jens Östberg’s crime thriller Blowfly Park (Flugparken).

The film’s star, Sverrir Gudnason, will be in attendance as an honorary guest of the festival. The crime thriller saw Gudnason pick up the best actor award at Sweden’s Guldbagge awards last month.

Director Östberg will also attend the festival to present the film.

Blowfly Park will also be a part of the Stockfish on Wheels initiative, where a select few films from the festival will tour Iceland afterthe festival. Amongst other films screening at Stockfish are Party Girl, Black Coal, Thin Ice, Goodbye to Language 3D and The Kidnapping of Michel Houellebecq.

Stockfisheffectively revives the Reykjavik Film Festival (Rff), which ran from 1978 to 2001.

The organisers, led by Oscar-nominated
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Juliette Binoche-led 'Nobody Wants the Night' to open 65th Berlinale

  • Hitfix
Juliette Binoche-led 'Nobody Wants the Night' to open 65th Berlinale
The Berlin International Film Festival announced early Friday morning that "Nobody Wants the Night," the most recent work by Spanish director Isabel Coixet, will open the festival as well as play in the international competition. Previous fest kick-offs included "The Grand Budapest Hotel" and "The Grandmaster." We’re sure "Nobody Wants the Night" is quite grand in its own right, even if it doesn’t flaunt it in the title. Based on true events, "Nobody Wants the Night" follows Josephine Peary (Academy Award-winner Juliette Binoche), a "mature, proud, determined and naive woman" living in Greenland circa 1909 and in love with celebrated Arctic adventurer Robert Peary (Gabriel Byrne), "a man who prefers glory and ice to the comforts of an upper-class home." Another woman, the "young but wise, brave and humble" Allaka (Academy Award-nominated Rinko Kikuchi), is in love with the same man… and pregnant with his child. As Coixet’s
See full article at Hitfix »

Isabel Coixet's Nobody Wants the Night to open Berlinale 2015

  • ScreenDaily
Isabel Coixet's Nobody Wants the Night to open Berlinale 2015
Juliette Binoche stars in the Arctic adventure.

The 65th Berlin International Film Festival will open on February 5 with the world premiere of Nobody Wants the Night, the latest film from Spanish director Isabel Coixet. It will participate in the international competition.

The Spanish-French-Bulgarian co-production takes place in 1908, in the Arctic seclusion of Greenland. The adventure film focuses on “courageous women and ambitious men who put anything at stake for love and glory”.

The ensemble cast includes French actress and Oscar winner Juliette Binoche (Camille Claudel 1915, The English Patient), Japanese actress Rinko Kikuchi (Babel, The Brothers Bloom) and Irish actor Gabriel Byrne (The Usual Suspects, Miller’s Crossing). Filming took place in Bulgaria, Norway and Spain.

Berlinale director Dieter Kosslick said: “Isabel Coixet has created an impressive and perceptive portrait of two women in extreme circumstances.”

He also revealed: “It will also be the first film to be screened in Dolby Atmos in our Berlinale Palast.”

Six
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Interview: Bruno Dumont on his 'Camille Claudel 1915'

  • CineVue
French director Bruno Dumont's Camille Claudel 1915 (2013), which premièred at last year's Berlin Film Festival, sees Juliette Binoche take the lead as the famous French artist and lover of Auguste Rodin. The main thrust of Dumont's latest sees Camille placed by her brother, the Catholic poet Paul Claudel (Jean-Luc Vincent), in a remote mental institution where she remained for 30 years up until her death. Here, Dumont constructs a stripped-down formal universe that bends not inwards to his tragic heroine, but pushes her outwards towards transcendental hopelessness and an easy acceptance of her desperate situation. Earlier this year we caught up with Dumont to discuss Camille Claudel 1915, his first collaboration with Binoche and the complexities of mental illness.
See full article at CineVue »
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