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I Am Not Your Negro (2016)

PG-13 | | Documentary | 17 February 2017 (USA)
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Writer James Baldwin tells the story of race in modern America with his unfinished novel, Remember This House.

Director:

Raoul Peck

Writers:

James Baldwin (writings), Raoul Peck (scenario)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 29 wins & 46 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Samuel L. Jackson ... Narration (voice)
James Baldwin ... Himself (archive footage)
Martin Luther King ... Himself (archive footage)
Malcolm X ... Himself (archive footage)
Medgar Evers Medgar Evers ... Himself (archive footage)
Robert F. Kennedy ... Himself (archive footage)
Harry Belafonte ... Himself (archive footage)
Paul Weiss Paul Weiss ... Himself (archive footage)
Dick Cavett ... Himself (archive footage)
H. Rap Brown H. Rap Brown ... Himself - Black Panther Party (archive footage)
Bob Dylan ... Himself (archive footage)
Leander Perez Leander Perez ... Himself - White Citizens Council (archive footage)
Sidney Poitier ... Various Roles (archive footage)
Ray Charles ... Himself (archive footage)
Doris Day ... Various Roles (archive footage)
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Storyline

In 1979, James Baldwin wrote a letter to his literary agent describing his next project, "Remember This House." The book was to be a revolutionary, personal account of the lives and assassinations of three of his close friends: Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. At the time of Baldwin's death in 1987, he left behind only 30 completed pages of this manuscript. Filmmaker Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

In "Remember This House" Raoul Peck envisions the book James Baldwin never finished -a radical narration about race in America, through the lives and assassinations of three of his friends: Martin Luther King Jr., Medgar Evers and Malcolm X. using only the writer's original words. See more »

Genres:

Documentary

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated PG-13 for disturbing violent images, thematic material, language and brief nudity | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Details

Official Sites:

Facebook | Instagram | See more »

Country:

Switzerland | France | Belgium | USA

Language:

English | French

Release Date:

17 February 2017 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Remember This House See more »

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Box Office

Opening Weekend USA:

$686,378, 3 February 2017, Limited Release

Gross USA:

$7,120,626, 2 June 2017
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Aspect Ratio:

1.78 : 1
See full technical specs »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

I Am Not Your Negro was one of 15 films included on the shortlist for the best feature documentary Oscar. See more »

Quotes

James Baldwin: To watch the TV screen for any length of time is to learn some really frightening things about the American sense of reality. We are cruelly trapped between what we would like to be and what we actually are. And we cannot possibly become what we would like to be until we are willing to ask ourselves just why the lives we lead on this continent are mainly so empty, so tame, and so ugly. These images are designed not to trouble, but to reassure. They also weaken our ability to deal with the world...
See more »

Connections

Features Uncle Tom's Cabin (1927) See more »

Soundtracks

Big Road Blues
Written by Tommy Johnson
© Peer International Corporation
Courtesy of Société d'Editions Musicales Internationales (S.E.M.I.), Paris
Performed by Tommy Johnson
Originally Recorded at The Memphis Auditorium, Memphis, TN, USA, 1928.
1991 Remastered
Produced by Billy Altman
Digital Producer John Snyder At BMG Recording Studios
Digital Engineer Jay Newland At BMG Recording Studios/ Joe Lopes At BMG Recording Studios
Transferred to digital tape from metal parts by Be Bernardo Cosachev At BMG Recording Studios
All rights reserved by BMG Music
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User Reviews

 
Brilliant
5 February 2017 | by view_and_reviewSee all my reviews

I've been on a roll lately with my movie choices. I've seen one delight after another and I get to add this movie to the list.

I Am Not Your Negro is a documentary based upon the writings of James Baldwin in which the essence is Black-White race relations in the U.S. James was an eloquent writer and speaker so I may be doing him a disservice by summarizing the documentary as such. He'd probably say it was a lot more than that--and it was. In it we got an ode to Medgar Evers, Malcolm X, and Martin Luther King Jr. These three iconic figures of the Civil Rights era were all killed within five years of each other and none lived to the age of 40.

There was a lot of riveting and provocative imagery in this documentary and it certainly will not appeal to a lot of people. There are some ugly truths about the American past that we all want to move on from but we'd do well not to forget.

I loved the film. If for no other reason than being treated to seeing and hearing James Baldwin speak. He was a brilliant and eloquent speaker and I had no clue. One thing mentioned was how Malcolm X, MLK and James Baldwin all had different view points and different approaches to the problems of Black people in America. They all spoke a truth as they had different backgrounds and different outlooks. But what is undeniable is that they all had the uplifting of their people in mind and all three personalities were invaluable to the African American cause.

This is a documentary that is going to disturb you and wake you up out of your reverie. The film is replete with historical footage and photos as well as recent footage--there are clips as recent as present day Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump--so you can't just relegate the picture to "old news" or "stuff from the past". It is relevant and as James Baldwin alluded to: it is a problem that has to be fixed because the survival of the country depends upon it.


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