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8/10
Great film, doesn't entirely fit the horror genre
16 September 2017
The director follows up Krisha, his first film, with It Comes at Night, and while it's an entirely different plot - a disease has ravaged the world, and people are boarding up their houses against the epidemic - some elements were a signature, including the sense of dread he carefully builds through the movie.

This is an atmospheric, psychological thriller, where the terror is about the capacity of human nature towards violence, self-protection and inevitably pain. A hell of a good film.
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The Invitation (I) (2015)
3/10
A terrible film
22 November 2016
Warning: Spoilers
This is a slasher flick disguised as an art-house horror movie with some clunky dialogue in Act 1 and some gestures towards emotional complexity of the characters. What's the easiest way to do that? One dead child, one gay couple, one failed business. Bingo, there you have it. The other thing that pisses me off is the minimum ten line length for reviews. IMDb, why would you do that? Why would I waste my breath writing really long reviews for shitty movies? Are you trying to encourage the watching of bad films, because people who dislike the movie don't want to spend time and effort reviewing it? Well, you can't stop me because not only was this movie awful, it was pretentiously awful, and I would like to extend my hand to other potential viewers and tell them: stop. it looks like chocolate, but it isn't.
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The Babadook (2014)
9/10
An awesome allegory - a movie about depression
15 November 2014
This is a horror movie true, and it comes with a good amount of scary music and shrieks and starts, but the heart of the movie lies in what the little boy, Samuel, says in the beginning while showing his magic trick: 'nothing is as it seems'.

And from then on, the story follows Amelia, the mother (played wonderfully by Essie Davis, whose unsettling, haunted eyes carry entire scenes) as she descends into severe depression, seemingly plagued by the Babadook, a monster that enters the house.

You never see the monster clearly: what we see is its effects as it possesses Amelia, her shift from good to evil and back again, her hallucinations. It's a well-wrought film with a brilliant ending, one of the best renderings of depression I have ever seen - parts of the movie get pretty close to what it probably feels like, 'horror' or no.
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