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Mystery and Imagination: Uncle Silas (1968)
Season 4, Episode 1
10/10
Gothic fun
1 August 2019
The low-budget British "Mystery and Imagination" series may not look like much to 21st century viewers spoiled by HD TV production values, but for connoisseurs of classic Gothic tales and supernatural horror it's a box of vintage delights. This high camp adaptation of Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's classic thriller features bravura melodramatic performances in an atmosphere somewhere between the original "Dark Shadows" soap opera and "The Rocky Horror Picture Show." If it sounds like it might be to your taste, definitely give it a try.
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8/10
Its own thing
24 May 2019
I was going to skip this series as the FX promos for it made it look terrible, but decided to order it anyway just to support Taika and Jemaine. I thought I should at least sample the first episode, and before I knew it I'd eaten up all nine in one afternoon. Though it carries over many reference points from the 2014 feature film set in New Zealand, notably its seductive shabby Goth look, this is a well-made series with its own story to tell.

Being set in New York City rather than Wellington, and being Clement's show more than Waititi's, this has a harsher "Flight of the Conchords" edge than the feature film, which was sweetened with Waititi's characteristic gemuetlichkeit. The Staten Island vampires have all too much in common with Vladislav and Deacon, particularly their trashy sexual habits. But just as Waititi's Viago was the heart of the Wellington vampire posse, Harvey Guillén's Guillermo is the emotional center of this series, as an embodiment of the aspirational American who can always be taken for a sucker with a promise of eternal life.
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10/10
Cupid is a knavish lad thus to make poor females mad
13 May 2019
Warning: Spoilers
Taika Waititi and Jemaine Clement did a promo for the German release of the feature film version of "What We Do In The Shadows," in which they went through a Berlin video store picking up and discussing favorite films (naturally including "Nosferatu" and "Bram Stoker's Dracula.") Surprisingly to me, Waititi made a point of loving the archetypal romcoms "When Harry Met Sally" and "Pretty Woman." But now I think about it WWDITS is tied together charmingly with the story of Viago's longing for his lost Katherine, and though "Eagle vs. Shark" hasn't been quite as commercially successful as Waititi's later features it is an exquisitely crafted and artistically accomplished example of the genre, in all its pleasures and horrors.

The classic Meg Ryan-Hugh Grant style romcoms are high fantasies, and while Waititi brings loads of fantastic elements of humor, music, even stop-motion animation to help us feel the emotions our romantic heroine Lily carries for the man she puts so much effort into wooing and holding on to, this primo auteur (who'd been nominated for an Oscar just a scant few years before) makes it clear that these pleasurable elements are all in her mind. As we learn that the object of her affections is so buried in his own complex pathologies and so completely unable to cope with her affection for him, the tension builds and we are on edge wondering how this unfolding disaster is going to play out.

BUT THIS IS EXACTLY HOW ROMCOMS WORK. Totally unsuitable people who are completely incapable of having a successful relationship are thrown together and magically it all works out. Look it up. "Love Actually," "You've Got Mail," "Two For the Road," "Four Weddings and a Funeral," they're ALL full of horrible examples of how not to choose a mate or carry on a successful partnership. "Eagle vs. Shark" simply lays the dissected elements of our favorite fertility plays bare for us and asks if we are not entertained.
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7/10
We need a restoration, STAT
8 April 2019
After years of despairing of ever getting to see this I finally was able to view a bad bootleg copy, and even through the bad picture, faded colors and gnarly soundtrack I could see there was something extraordinary there. Though its leering sexual politics and archaic atmosphere of Viennese schmah date it terribly, leaving this film to rot in obscurity is a crime against Powell and Pressburger's cinematic legacy.

"The Red Shoes" and "Tales of Hoffman" pioneered the daring fusion of high art and popular entertainment that would inspire MGM's great postwar musicals, and "Oh...Rosalinda!" shows how much cross-pollination was going on between Powell in London and Stanley Donen in Hollywood. I can imagine Rouben Mamoulian ordering a screening of this film as part of preproduction for "Silk Stockings."
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10/10
Waititi and Clement's well-earned place in the classic horror pantheon
4 April 2019
I watched my first horror films during the Nixon era, and over the ensuing years got so sick of vampires and werewolves and horror comedy in general that by the time this came along I ignored it. I only got interested after finding out that one of the leads played Tamatoa in "Moana" and another directed an Avengers film. There is solid star power in this little movie which lifts it above the ordinary, but everything about it is extremely well done, from story and acting to special effects. Whether or not you find it laugh out loud funny depends on how much you like its "Flight of the Conchords" style bro comedy, but I've always believed that at the heart of the best comedy is good theater, and this is eminently watchable as such.

Where horror parody usually falls down is by not really understanding what it's purporting to be making fun of. WWDITS makes intelligent references to "Nosferatu," "Lost Boys" and Francis Ford Coppola's "Dracula" (and I'm sure the makers knew WWDITS' English cousin "Being Human" backwards and forwards) but it genuinely has the texture and atmosphere of a Gothic horror piece. The existential absurdity of the vampire's life is confronted in a way most other vampire stories are too busy or shallow to even touch. It also uses the aesthetics of low budget horror in a craftful way that I'd thought had been forgotten decades ago.

I have no hope that the new TV series based on this property will retain the charms of the original. Although Jemaine Clement and Taika Waititi are involved as directors and writers, they will definitely be missed in front of the camera.
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10/10
Now I get it
30 March 2019
I first heard about Frank Sidebottom when I read a preview of the Michael Fassbender film "Frank" on the Guardian UK site and thought, this phenomenon of a guy who became a novelty pop star while wearing a John Held Jr. mask that he refused to take off even when doing radio interviews sounds fascinating, but why would I want to watch a fiction film about a fictional guy who works for a fictional version of Frank? What I really wanted is this film: a documentary that would explain to a Yank like me what made Frank Sidebottom and his creator Chris Sievey so appealing to his British audiences. (I've tried watching YouTube videos of Frank and was only mystified and a little annoyed. As I said, I'm a Yank.)

Like "The Nomi Song," this film does a superlative job of making a very unique artist from an esoteric branch of New Wave subculture seem like an old friend. I highly recommend it to anyone interested in British pop culture, especially British humor and the original punk/New Wave era.
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Chimera (1991– )
7/10
Horror is not a game of perfect
18 March 2019
Warning: Spoilers
I trust the reviewers who say that "Monkeyboy," the feature-length edit of this four-hour miniseries, is terrible (terrible name too) but I understand ITV's impulse to cut it down. The novels of Stephen King aside, horror generally works best in shorter form (as in this series' director's famous Ghost Story for Christmas mini-shockers) and telling the story as a rambling mystery thriller full of unnecessary characters (including a desperately uninteresting leading man) and endless swarms of black ops ruins any opportunity it might have had to be genuinely suspenseful.

It also borrows from previous sci-fi/horrors on an "Event Horizon" scale, from "Planet of the Apes" to the "Psycho" trick of killing off the first protagonist (with a kitchen knife no less) to Chucky and Freddy's red striped sweater as a signifier of mass homicide to pretty much everything from every version of "Frankenstein" up to that time. Another reviewer mentions Nigel Kneale but the debt this production owes to Kneale's Quatermass series just underlines how Kneale could be as derivative as he wanted to because his ideas and method of presentation were so original. Kneale made all the points Stephen Gallagher tries to make about the madness and cruelty of humanity's treatment of nature in his "Beasts" series decades earlier and with more insight and feeling.

The key to what makes this highly non-perfect series so memorable can be found in how other reviewers mention it giving them nightmares as kids. Anything can be forgiven a horror that contains genuinely nightmarish elements. The rampage at the Jenner Clinic puts you into the action in an uncomfortably intimate way--the bleeding into the fruit-filled liquid--and the shots of the human-orangutan hybrid infant are haunting and pitiful. The use of a keening soprano melody to underscore moments of horror at the end of the first and last episodes is a cheap sort of manipulation but you know how potent cheap music is.

One of the really brilliant elements of this series is casting. Principal actors seem to have been chosen with an eye for elongated and otherwise unusually shaped faces, so that when we finally see Chad's face it looks more human than we've expected. And this being a British production, all the actors are of a quality far above what you'd find in an American horror, which makes all the difference. Kenneth Cranham does an amusing version of the archetypal sneering villain that in itself is worth watching.
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Ringu (1995 TV Movie)
2/10
nope
24 February 2019
Through most of this film I was thinking it was pretty well done, not anywhere nearly as stylish and original as the much more famous original feature film version of "Ringu," but a decent little sci fi/mystery story. Then the climax hit, piling extreme element on extreme element, and I realized why this version has faded into oblivion. As with "Rasen" and "Ringu 2," it just demonstrates how different filmmakers can do such radically different things with the same source material--in this case, going way over the edge into tasteless exploitation.
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Frozen (I) (2013)
7/10
So this is the famous Frozen!
19 February 2019
Warning: Spoilers
I am so not the demographic that this film is made for that I hope I can be forgiven for not loving it. A big part of this is that I just don't love the Pixar animation style, and I don't think this film makes particularly good use of that technology. There were a couple of sequences that jumped out at me for being too obviously motion-captured in a way that took me out of the film.

Being someone who's spent most of my life in a Frozen style climate, I was also uncomfortable with the unrealistically light clothing the characters wore in the snow and ice--in a non-animated world they would all be disfigured by severe frostbite if not struck down by hypothermia. You can tell this was a film written, designed and executed in Southern California. I could also tell this was made to be seen in IMAX, and trace the direct line from the snow antics in this to the new Grinch (also the big reindeer sidekick.)

I don't remember the specifics of the original Hans Christian Andersen story, except that I found it ultra-creepy when I read it as a child. I do think the filmmakers did a good job of Disneyfying it as well as introducing the Bechdel-friendly element of making the protagonists two sisters instead of boy-girl sweethearts. Which I suspect is the real secret of this film's success: TWO awesome princesses in one movie! Finally, two little girls can play princesses from the same movie at the same time!

One of the things that made me hesitate to watch this for so long was the ghastly "Goofy" look of Olaf. Josh Gad did absolute wonders in making this hideously designed character not only tolerable but a pleasure to listen to if not watch.
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Princess Tutu (2002–2003)
10/10
Germanic Romanticism meets Japanese anime
8 February 2019
I agree with other commentators here that though this superficially appears to be a Disneyesque princess movie for little girls who are mad about ballet, it's actually an edgy high camp Gothic steampunk superhero/coming of age epic that handles its complex metafictional narrative with a finesse that would-be literary writers would do well to study.

Unless you are completely unable to read subtitles, I urge you to watch this while listening to the original Japanese soundtrack. The voice acting on the English-dubbed version is putrid.
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The X-Files (1993–2018)
6/10
I Want To Like
6 February 2019
This is such a famous series, and I've tried over the years to get into it but its heavy-handed Coast to Coast AM approach to the paranormal and David Duchovny's grossly incompetent acting just push me out of it every time. One thing I do like that came out of it: the Theatre on King in Ontario did some truly inspired stage adaptations of some of the early episodes, and they're up on YouTube if you want to see how X-Files ought to be done.
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Detectorists (2014–2017)
4/10
Not enough
18 January 2019
A couple of ugly middle-aged guys looking for sex and easy money. I guess it's realistic and honest enough, but it just doesn't appeal to me.
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4/10
Eminently missable
4 January 2019
This isn't a costume film so much as a feature-length Vogue photoshoot. In 2018 are we really still presenting Mary Stuart and Elizabeth Tudor into good nice woman who has a baby vs. bad mean woman who doesn't have babies?
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The Favourite (2018)
4/10
nope
4 January 2019
I realize there's a legitimate market for upscale BDSM films--that's Lars von Trier's whole career--but it's not for me. I found it repulsive and meretricious, not to mention the most grotesque depiction of lesbianism since "The Killing of Sister George."
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Labyrinth (1986)
1/10
One of the rock-bottom worst of a generally loathesome genre
18 December 2018
An unsympathetically written heroine, transformed through Jennifer Connelly's near-affectless performance into a psychopath. An unexpectedly wretched performance from the usually tasteful David Bowie, including the music. A complete overall lack of charm, interest and relatability and you've got pretty much everything there is to hate about the 1980s sword and sorcery genre.
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4/10
Yonderlanding the Dark Crystal
27 November 2018
I'm so much not in the target demographic for this film that you can pretty much disregard my rating if you are. I watched it because I love the series Yonderland and I wanted to go back and see some of the fantasy sources I thought the show was referencing/satirizing, and suspected this was a main source. And yes, there's a lot of Yonderland here in embryonic form, no doubt in part becausse the head of puppeteering for Yonderland is a Henson veteran who also worked on this film. So there's considerable material here for a Yonderland fan to geek out over. The character design of Jen and Kira, one of the best things about the film, reminds me a little of Elf's second series redesign. So does the best thing about the film, which is the exotic, atmospheric sets for the wild places that the characters move through, very reminiscent of the landscape of Yonderland. Of course this film lacks everything that makes Yonderland a great series--great stories and scripts, acting, wit and charm--but if there had been no Dark Crystal there wouldn't be a Yonderland, so there you go.
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10/10
My prediction
19 November 2018
The general reaction to this film seems to be "It's a totally unnecessary remake of a classic!" Depending, of course, on WHICH version you're calling classic--the original book, the Chuck Jones-Boris Karloff TV special, or maybe you're a fierce Jim Carrey fan. Anyway, I predict that by this time next year this will be the go-to Grinch and will remain so unless or until a better, more timely version comes along. And Benedict was absolutely correct in choosing to play this Grinch in a Middle American accent. It would have been really weird if he hadn't.
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It (I) (2017)
5/10
Crowd-pleasing but soulless reboot
20 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
I realize that the 1990 TV miniseries version is universally dumped on and don't have a problem with the property being remade for a new generation. But whether or not you care about such things, the old It had a tangible soul and this one doesn't.

You can criticize the old It for not being scary enough, for not having good enough special effects, or a good enough cast, or whatever other reason you can come up with: the two things it lacked were fashionable edginess (no swearing or sex or violence of a level pleasing to today's audiences would have been allowed on broadcast television back then) and teenagers. The characters in old It were shown as children and middle-aged adults, which was fine for a time when television made book on appealing to as many demographics as possible, whereas new It is aimed at the prime demographic for theatrical horror films, which is kids who aren't technically old enough to see R or even PG-13 movies but are watching them anyway. That's why the main protagonists were changed from pubescent children to near-adults.

Old It is about childhood trauma and abuse and its lasting effects, and how friendship and love can help us cope with it. This It is about, well, teenagers in a horror movie. There's no psychological realism in it whatsoever. A kid who's sadistic to other kids is revealed to have a sadistic father: sadistic kid kills sadistic father: that's a horror movie's idea of a satisfying resolution. A girl whose father is being creepily sexual with her is creepily sexual with the man at the drug store so her friends can rob the place: that's a teen movie's concept of morality. Meanwhile the serial-killing CGI bundle only succeeds in putting our heroine into a state of suspended animation, for no other reason than she has to be kept alive for the sequel and nobody cares about those other dead kids. Violating the rules of your own fictional universe for purposes of moving your plot in the direction you want it to go in is never a good precedent, especially when you've still got half the story left to tell.

I've never liked the design of this Pennywise. He doesn't look like any clown that any small town American child would have encountered, and unless you find Germanic people innately creepy I don't understand why Bill Skarsgaard was even cast in the role. I understand why they cast Tim Curry--Frankenfurter, like Pennywise, is both a clown and a stony-hearted alien, and as in "Rocky Horror" Tim delivered. And the character design of the old Pennywise is genius. He looks like a standard issue American clown, but if you look at him just the right way, you can see the skull in his face.

I think the proof of the pudding is you can dub Ugandan Knuckles or Gangnam Style into sequences featuring new Pennywise and his menace evaporates. But nothing will strip old Pennywise of his ability to haunt us.
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Stewart Lee: Content Provider (2018 TV Special)
7/10
Behind the wizard's curtain
20 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
I think "Jerry Springer: The Opera" is one of the great theater works of our time as well as the most accurate fictional depiction of this era in the history of the United States of America, so I approach Stewart Lee's other work with a certain reverence through knowing what he's capable of at his best. Having watched "Content Provider" several times I'm inclined to take what he says in it at face value. I see a man who's exhausted and bored with touring a full-length stand-up act, using the modernist strategy of working that exhaustion and boredom into his act. He takes out his feelings on his audience: he is nasty and abusive and deliberately annoying.

Being a well-educated theater professional he himself cites the Verfremsdungseffekt, that traditional right of postmodern performers to deliberately cheat their audiences of entertainment value. And yeah, I get that, and given that I've seen Lee's work exclusively through bootleg recordings (they are hard to get legally in the U.S.) I'm not in a position to complain. And I do understand Lee's frustration. He'd prefer a career like Victoria Wood's or Charlie Brooker's, with more of a variety of opportunities to use his creative potential, especially his writing. But he's honestly not that good of a writer. To do what Victoria or Charlie have done, you need a good grasp of conventional narrative-building and a willingness to compromise your edginess with an agreeableness to allow the audience to have maybe a little more fun than they deserve.

Look at it this way. Victoria's "Acorn Antiques: The Musical" clearly was modeled after "Jerry Springer: The Opera," and aimed at the same general demographic of high camp musical theater fanciers. And Victoria wrote it knowing the same art theater conventions Lee knows: her caricature of the preening postmodernist director embodies the Verfremsdungseffekt attitude. Which she gleefully eviscerates and moves on to the next tap number. Which takes me towards the conclusion that the real genius behind "Jerry" wasn't Lee after all, but his collaborator Richard Thomas--but I pull back from that remembering the contemptible mess that was "Anna Nicole." I guess "Jerry Springer" was just one of those pieces of theatrical synergy that works once and vanishes. If I were Lee, that would make me scream onstage every night.
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The Changes (1975– )
10/10
Absorbing dystopian fantasy
17 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
As an American getting into Doctor Who for the first time as an adult, I was curious about the other celebrated fantasy TV series that British children were watching in the mid-20th century--Escape Into Night, Children of the Stones, The Box of Delights, and The Owl Service. None of those really appeal to my inner child, but the Changes does. Its child heroine Nicky is the sort of intrepid, no-nonsense female protagonist I've always loved, from Lewis Carroll's Alice to Claudia in "From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler."

As Stewart Lee pointed out, it's a story that captures the adolescent experience of loneliness and alienation in a very relatable way. It's also very 1970s in how it turns authority figures on their heads. Throughout her adventures, Nicky is repeatedly abandoned, betrayed and abused by older people, and learning how to rely on her own good judgment and make useful alliances is part of her story arc. There are no "name" actors in the program and the cast seems to have been chosen and directed for naturalism rather than theatrical effect. Victoria Williams is believable and sincere and that's all she needs to be.
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The Nightmare Man (1981– )
8/10
Sci-fi/horror in the style of Kneale
7 October 2018
Warning: Spoilers
I enjoyed this unpretentious mystery/SF/horror/cold war thriller, but then I'd been marinating in vintage British genre products like the Hammer, Amicus and Tigon films and Nigel Kneale's "Quatermass" series and "Beasts," so I was in just the right frame of mind for it. You might need more expensive production values and more extreme thrills in order to get off, like that commentator who scornfully compared Celia Imrie's character to Miss Babs. Babs didn't repair cameras and do a spot of cartography on the side in addition to running the shop, hon.
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8/10
It's film noir! No, it's science fiction! No, it's horror!
23 September 2018
Warning: Spoilers
Let's just call it one of those little gems that flew out of the gears of the studio era Hollywood machine while it was manufacturing more important things.

The radio adaptation of Curt Siodmak's "Donovan's Brain" starring Orson Welles is still the best of the many versions and ripoffs of that perennial brain-in-a-vat story, mainly because it had Orson Welles in it, but this is the best film version I've seen, probably because it had Erich von Stroheim. I think in both cases the production may well have taken advantage of having a great director in the cast to add some uncredited fine tuning.

The eccentric beauty of the Southwestern Gothic "castle" where the mad scientist keeps his lab, the lush shadowy textures of the lab with its glowing tank and simple but effective light bulb signaling the electrical activity of Donovan's brain, Stroheim's quietly hilarious choice of giving his character a pronounced limp (maybe to address the lack of a traditional deformed lab assistant) are all details I love. And though Stroheim naturally makes the most of his screen time, Richard Arlen is the one who really carries the film by making Donovan's takeover of Cory's mind convincing. Vera Ralston completely lacks charisma in a role that really calls for an Ida Lupino, but you can't have everything in a B picture.
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Rawhead Rex (1986)
5/10
Could have been much better with a little effort
22 September 2018
Warning: Spoilers
The first half of this film is a not-bad combination of an homage to 1950s Hollywood creature feature and 1970s British "Home Counties horror." The story is massively derivative but well-paced and genuinely suspenseful (especially in the scenes of the American family's interrupted trip to Dublin), and even the cheap, lazy and unimaginatively realized special effects are forgivable in the context of the film's blatant unoriginality. Then at the point where Rawhead Rex abducts the American son, the movie completely falls apart: it's no longer fun, it's no longer suspenseful, and what had been just silly becomes blatantly stupid.

I don't really understand why this film was set in Ireland. Maybe because there hadn't yet been a major British horror film that took place there? There was nothing the least bit Irish about it that I could see. It actually might have been more Irish if it had been set in Boston.
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10/10
Tasteful and timely
21 May 2018
Warning: Spoilers
When I first found out what this series was about I said no, no no no no, I will not watch THAT. But a friend who prewatched it for me assured me it wasn't at all explicit, and though only a sadist on the level of poor Patrick Melrose's ogrish dad would watch this series for fun, it does tell a difficult story very well. Of course it's a great showcase for Cumberbatch, but everybody's good in this, especially Hugo Weaving as the psychopathic father. Even the usually grotesque Jennifer Jason Leigh manages to act like a real human being for once.

This is an era when people who've experienced the unspeakable are speaking out, and this series, based on the autobiographical writings of a man who was sexually and psychologically abused by his parents, is a well-timed addition to the ongoing conversation we're having about the damage done by sexual predators and the useful idiots who help them get away with it.
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10/10
Williams writes for Warner Bros.
17 August 2017
Imagine if you will that the young Tennessee Williams, after attending an art house retrospective of early to mid forties Warner Bros. films--particularly those featuring John Garfield and Sydney Greenstreet, with a special emphasis on the Twilight Zoneish "Between Two Worlds"--was inspired to write a a high camp entertainment for intellectuals that was an homage to the mystical aspects of Warners, with a really good (and really gay) cameo for Peter Lorre. That's the premise of this production of "Camino Real," and I think they got it absolutely right. If you don't recognize that Martin Sheen and Albert Dekker are playing their characters in the style of Garfield and Greenstreet, you're missing a significant layer of meaning, just as you're going to miss a lot in "The Rocky Horror Picture Show" if you aren't familiar with Ken Russell and the Hammer Frankenstein films. But it's there if you look for it and it'll make a lot more sense if you do.
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