Cannes Review: With The Velvet Underground, Todd Haynes Crafts a Visually Harmonious Documentary

Cannes Review: With The Velvet Underground, Todd Haynes Crafts a Visually Harmonious Documentary
If you told people in 1967 that Andy Warhol’s house band just released one of the most revered rock albums of all-time, they would ask what they’re called, and when you told them they would laugh. As far as the public was concerned, there were a hundred acts capable of that historical success in the ‘60s, and none were called the Velvet Underground (or Nico).

To a certain extent they would be right. It would be another decade before the banana-adorned The Velvet Underground & Nico would have its pop cultural comeuppance and over half a century before the glam avant-garde group would receive definitive documentary treatment by one of the best living filmmakers. But as history and said doc have proven, we would have the last laugh in that exchange.

The arresting mood of writer-director Todd Haynes’s The Velvet Underground––his first feature documentary but far from his
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