7.6/10
16,016
109 user 62 critic

Mrs. Miniver (1942)

Not Rated | | Drama, Romance, War | 1 December 1942 (Sweden)
Trailer
2:39 | Trailer
A British family struggles to survive the first months of World War II.

Director:

William Wyler

Writers:

Arthur Wimperis (screenplay), George Froeschel (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
Reviews
Won 6 Oscars. Another 4 wins & 7 nominations. See more awards »

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Photos

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Greer Garson ... Mrs. Miniver
Walter Pidgeon ... Clem Miniver
Teresa Wright ... Carol Beldon
May Whitty ... Lady Beldon (as Dame May Whitty)
Reginald Owen ... Foley
Henry Travers ... Mr. Ballard
Richard Ney ... Vin Miniver
Henry Wilcoxon ... Vicar
Christopher Severn Christopher Severn ... Toby Miniver
Brenda Forbes ... Gladys (Housemaid)
Clare Sandars Clare Sandars ... Judy Miniver
Marie De Becker Marie De Becker ... Ada
Helmut Dantine ... German Flyer
John Abbott ... Fred
Connie Leon Connie Leon ... Simpson
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Storyline

The Minivers, an English "middle-class" family experience life in the first months of World War II. While dodging bombs, the Minivers' son courts Lady Beldon's granddaughter. A rose is named after Mrs. Miniver and entered in the competition against Lady Beldon's rose. Written by Michael Rice <TheMikeRic@aol.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In Her Arms . . . He Felt A Quiet Peace No Terror Could Disturb See more »

Genres:

Drama | Romance | War

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The closing speech, delivered by the vicar (Henry Wilcoxon) at the end of the film, was actually written by Wilcoxon and directorWilliam Wyler the night before it was filmed. Wyler had grown dissatisfied with the speech the screenwriters had come up with and convinced Wilcoxon to help him improve it. The speech proved to be integral to the film's success and was distributed across America and Europe in order to boost wartime morale amongst soldiers and civilians alike. See more »

Goofs

Just after Mrs. Miniver hands the German pilot a bottle of milk to drink, spilled milk appears all over his coat. The milk subsequently disappears and reappears on the coat several times between shots. See more »

Quotes

Carol Beldon: I know how comfortable it is to curl up with a nice, fat book full of big words and think you're going to solve all the problems in the universe. But you're not, you know. A bit of action is required every now and then.
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Crazy Credits

Opening credits prologue: This story of an average English middle-class family begins with the summer of 1939; when the sun shone down on a happy, careless people, who worked and played, reared their children and tended their gardens in that happy, easy-going England that was so soon to be fighting desperately for her way of life and for life itself. See more »

Connections

Featured in MGM: When the Lion Roars: The Lion Reigns Supreme (1992) See more »

Soundtracks

Onward, Christian Soldiers
(1871) (uncredited)
Music by Arthur Sullivan
Lyrics by Sabine Baring-Gould (1865)
Sung by all at a church service
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User Reviews

 
A film which justifies its status as a major classic.
27 August 2004 | by bbhlthphSee all my reviews

It must be over 50 years since I first saw this classic film, and for some reason I never watched it again until recently. To do so was an interesting experience - reliving many memories of the war years which I mostly spent in London. I think the reason why there was such a long interval before I decided to watch it again was a subconscious recognition that it was produced at a time of crisis, largely for political reasons, and a feeling this was unduly evident in the screenplay. Mrs. Miniver was released a few months after Pearl Harbour, at a time when many U.S. citizens wondered why their country should be expending its efforts fighting in Europe when it was Japan which had attacked them The film was quite clearly written, produced and directed with the objective of answering this question. Winston Churchill has made it clear that he regarded the release of this film as one of the biggest single contributions made to the allied war effort (worth, in his words, "a flotilla of destroyers"), and it is hard today not to regard the film as primarily a piece of patriotic propaganda. However the deft and capable direction of William Wyler and the almost uniformly great acting by the cast, particularly Greer Garson as Mrs. Miniver, go a very long way towards concealing the fact that one is viewing a film with a message and few would deny that the Oscars it won were thoroughly deserved. Mrs. Miniver certainly earns its place on any short list of film classics.

There are of course already many comments on this film in the database, I would have been reluctant to add any more but for the realization that people of my age who lived in England during the war are becoming increasingly few, and our comments - which must have a rather different perspective to those of younger generations - will not continue to be available for very much longer. Many of the very fine sequences in this film have already been reviewed more than adequately by others and I will not comment further on them; but two sequences which I found particularly evocative were the call on amateur sailors to help evacuate the British army from Dieppe, and the pub scene where the locals were listening to the British traitor Lord Haw Haw broadcasting from Germany and telling his listeners how futile any further resistance would be. In stating this, I am simply confirming that for such documentary type films people who lived through the events depicted will assess the film on the basis of their personal memories rather than on their cinematographic quality.

Ultimately, both on its first viewing and when viewing it again a few days ago, I found that for me watching Mrs. Miniver was irritating because it inevitably showed an American view of life as it was in England. Numerous very small points indicated that we were seeing a glimpse of middle class English life through American eyes. Whilst as an English born viewer I found this irritating, it did not in any way detract from the primary purpose of the film in showing Americans what life in wartime Britain was really like, and why their involvement in the war in Europe was so vital. Ultimately I had to accept that this was a great film which well deserves its classic status.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German

Release Date:

1 December 1942 (Sweden) See more »

Also Known As:

Mrs. Miniver See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$1,344,000 (estimated)
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Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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