7.8/10
51,614
237 user 53 critic

The Longest Day (1962)

Trailer
3:08 | Trailer
The events of D-Day, told on a grand scale from both the Allied and German points of view.

Writers:

Cornelius Ryan (screenplay), Cornelius Ryan (book) | 4 more credits »
Reviews
Popularity
1,503 ( 3,129)
Won 2 Oscars. Another 6 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Eddie Albert ... Col. Thompson
Paul Anka ... U.S. Army Ranger
Arletty ... Madame Barrault
Jean-Louis Barrault ... Father Louis Roulland
Richard Beymer ... Pvt. Dutch Schultz
Hans Christian Blech ... Maj. Werner Pluskat
Bourvil ... Mayor of Colleville
Richard Burton ... Flying Officer David Campbell
Wolfgang Büttner Wolfgang Büttner ... Maj. Gen. Dr. Hans Speidel
Red Buttons ... Pvt. John Steele
Pauline Carton ... Maid
Sean Connery ... Pvt. Flanagan
Ray Danton ... Capt. Frank
Irina Demick ... Janine Boitard (as Irina Demich)
Fred Dur Fred Dur ... U.S. Army Ranger Major
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Storyline

In 1944, the U.S. Army and Allied forces plan a huge invasion landing in Normandy, France. Despite bad weather, General Dwight D. Eisenhower gives the okay and the Allies land at Normandy. General Norma Cota travels with his men onto Omaha Beach. With much effort, and lost life, they get off the beach, traveling deep into French territory. The German military, due to arrogance, ignorance and a sleeping Adolf Hitler, delay their response to the Allied landing, with crippling results. Written by Jwelch5742

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

This is the day that changed the world... When history held its breath. See more »

Genres:

Action | Drama | History | War

Certificate:

G | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Pundits nicknamed this movie "Z-Day". See more »

Goofs

After the invasion begins, exterior closeup shots of an airplane dropping a canister shows it covered with water droplets. However, the water droplets are stationary. Had it been an actual aircraft in flight, the wind would be pushing the water backwards. See more »

Quotes

RAF pilot at flight base: [talking about the invasion] Tonight. I KNOW it's tonight.
Flight Officer David Campbell: So it's tonight. Suits me fine. Tonight. This afternoon. NOW!
[pause]
Flight Officer David Campbell: Or, at least, as soon as I finish this beer.
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Crazy Credits

There is a 20-second overture on a black screen, no 20th Century Fox logo (in spite of this being one of their most expensive productions), and a six-minute cold open before the title is displayed. Apart from the title, there are no credits at the beginning of the film. All cast and crew credits are at the end of the film. See more »

Alternate Versions

There are two distinct versions of this film: in one, all the characters speak English; in the other, the French and German characters speak their own respective languages, with subtitles. In the latter version the theme played over the end titles is an instrumental, while the former has lyrics written by Paul Anka (the latest DVD version contains both the German/French speaking and the vocal version of the film's musical theme). See more »


Soundtracks

Don't Fence Me In
(uncredited)
Music by Cole Porter
Played on the radio when Gen. Cota is introduced
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User Reviews

Candian Presence in The Longest Day
3 September 2011 | by tggilchristSee all my reviews

The previous comments about Canadian participation in the Normandy invasion were significant - insofar as there weren't very many. One of the five Normandy beaches was Canadian (Juno), but there is almost no mention of this in The Longest Day, and I'm sure that one would be hard pressed to find many Americans (and not a whole lot more Canadians) who know this. Unfortunately, it is movies such as this and other popular media that shape the historic knowledge of people on both sides of the border. In the near absence of Canadian content, I find it ironic that a young Canadian (Paul Anka) not only played a part in the movie as an American soldier, but also wrote the theme music. I find it also ironic that the legendary rifle used by US soldiers during WW2 and shown in this movie was designed by a Canadian as well (Garand is a French Canadian name). The cruelest irony, of course, is the fact that thousands of Canadian soldiers were maimed or lost there lives on 6 June 1944 and the days thereafter, with virtually no acknowledgement in this movie. I have always enjoyed watching this movie, but it is unfortunate that I must use my imagination to see in it the heroic and selfless wartime effort of my father's generation, in similar fashion to viewers in the US and UK.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | German | French

Release Date:

4 October 1962 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Longest Day See more »

Filming Locations:

Bénouville, Calvados, France See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$10,000,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

4-Track Stereo (Westrex Recording System)| 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints)

Aspect Ratio:

2.35 : 1
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