A film director and his strange friends struggle to produce the first major silent feature film in forty years.

Director:

Mel Brooks

Writers:

Mel Brooks (screenplay), Ron Clark (screenplay) | 3 more credits »
1 win & 6 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Mel Brooks ... Mel Funn
Marty Feldman ... Marty Eggs
Dom DeLuise ... Dom Bell
Sid Caesar ... Studio Chief
Harold Gould ... Engulf
Ron Carey ... Devour
Bernadette Peters ... Vilma Kaplan
Carol Arthur ... Pregnant Lady
Liam Dunn ... Newsvendor
Fritz Feld ... Maitre d'
Chuck McCann ... Studio Gate Guard
Valerie Curtin ... Intensive Care Nurse
Yvonne Wilder ... Studio Chief's Secretary
Harry Ritz ... Man in Tailor Shop
Charlie Callas ... Blindman
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Storyline

Aspiring filmmakers Mel Funn, Marty Eggs and Dom Bell go to a financially troubled studio with an idea for a silent movie. In an effort to make the movie more marketable, they attempt to recruit a number of big name stars to appear, while the studio's creditors attempt to thwart them. The film contains only one word of dialogue, spoken by an unlikely source. Written by Scott Renshaw <as.idc@forsythe.stanford.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

In glorious phonic sound.

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The villainous company Engulf & Devour is a spoof of Gulf + Western, which between 1965 and 1970 swallowed up eighty different companies, including Paramount Pictures in 1966. See more »

Goofs

As the car carrying Funn, Eggs and Bell approaches the gatehouse at Big Picture Studios, the windscreen of their car is flat on the hood of the car. But in the following shot from the rear of the car, the windscreen is obviously up when they crash into the lowered barrier, and the windscreen is again down as the car rolls under the barrier. See more »

Quotes

Mel Funn: [on Vilma] She's incredible! I hope to God she's not a female impersonator.
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Crazy Credits

When the movie starts, the word ''HELLO'' can be seen. Then the camera zooms on the O and Hollywood can be seen. See more »

Alternate Versions

A reissue in 1978 (entitled "Silent Movie Plus") added additional scenes not in the original theatrical version. One scene reportedly had a cameo by Peter Frampton. See more »


Soundtracks

Let's Face the Music and Dance
(uncredited)
Music by Irving Berlin
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User Reviews

 
Brooks' overlooked gem
30 November 2004 | by jrs-8See all my reviews

When one speaks of Mel Brooks the talk immediately goes to either "Blazing Saddles" or "Young Frankenstein" or "The Producers." How often do you hear mention of "Silent Movie?" After watching this film again just yesterday I can say that this film is also a masterpiece and ranks on the same lines of the previous films.

"Silent Movie" is deceptively simple in plot. A washed up movie director (Brooks) comes up with an idea to make a silent movie to help save the studio that once employed him. Once given the okay by studio chief Sid Caesar, Brooks and his sidekicks Marty Feldman and Dom DeLuise set out to find five superstars to help make the movie a hit. And that's all there is to it - plot wise. What Brooks does is fill every single scene with great ideas. Shots that have absolutely nothing to do with the story are thrown in to get a laugh. Brooks hits the bullseye most of the time. I don't think I went more then a minute without laughing throughout.

Another master stroke is John Morris' rousing score that fills the movie from beginning to end. Without it the movie would have failed. And, yes, it truly is a silent movie save for one spoken word which most people probably are aware of anyway. It's another classic Mel Brooks moment.

"Silent Movie" followed "Young Frankenstein" which followed "Blazing Saddles." It's safe to say Brooks was at his peak during this period. His quality of films began to dip after "Silent Movie" starting with the amusing but overblown "High Anxiety." But we still have this time period to savor when Brooks may have been the best (if not then equal to Woody Allen) comedy director of his time.


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

16 June 1976 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Silent Movie Plus See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$4,400,000 (estimated)

Gross USA:

$36,145,695

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$36,145,695
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Company Credits

Production Co:

Crossbow Productions See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono (Westrex Recording System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

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