6.8/10
70,746
265 user 104 critic

Saturday Night Fever (1977)

Trailer
1:19 | Trailer
Anxious about his future after high school, a 19-year-old Italian-American from Brooklyn tries to escape the harsh reality of his bleak family life by dominating the dance floor at the local disco.

Director:

John Badham

Writers:

Nik Cohn (story "Tribal Rites of the New Saturday Night"), Norman Wexler (screenplay)
Reviews
Popularity
2,427 ( 107)
Nominated for 1 Oscar. Another 4 wins & 11 nominations. See more awards »

Videos

Photos

Edit

Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
John Travolta ... Tony Manero
Karen Lynn Gorney ... Stephanie
Barry Miller ... Bobby C.
Joseph Cali ... Joey
Paul Pape ... Double J.
Donna Pescow ... Annette
Bruce Ornstein Bruce Ornstein ... Gus
Julie Bovasso ... Flo
Martin Shakar ... Frank Jr.
Sam Coppola ... Dan Fusco (as Sam J. Coppola)
Nina Hansen ... Grandmother
Lisa Peluso Lisa Peluso ... Linda
Denny Dillon ... Doreen
Bert Michaels ... Pete
Robert Costanzo ... Paint Store Customer (as Robert Costanza)
Edit

Storyline

Nineteen-year-old Brooklyn native Tony Manero lives for Saturday nights at the local disco, where he's king of the club, thanks to his stylish moves on the dance floor. But outside of the club, things don't look so rosy. At home, Tony fights constantly with his father and has to compete with his family's starry-eyed view of his older brother, a priest. Nor can he find satisfaction at his dead-end job at a small paint store. However, things begin to change when he spies Stephanie Mangano in the disco and starts training with her for the club's dance competition. Stephanie dreams of the world beyond Brooklyn, and her plans to move to Manhattan just over the bridge soon change Tony's life forever. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

For Tony Manero, freedom comes once a week. It comes on Saturday night... it's called Saturday Night Fever. See more »

Genres:

Drama | Music

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for strong language, sexuality/nudity and some drug content | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

When Robert Stigwood visited The Bee Gees in France to ask them to write the soundtrack, they were busy mixing a live album. The group declined an offer to read the script but said they already had several song titles in mind, such as "Stayin' Alive", "Night Fever" and H"ow Deep Is Your Love?", but nothing else. Three days later a tape was delivered to Stigwood in London containing demo versions of all the songs. These were used as playback on set and to choreograph and shoot the dance sequences to. However, in post-production a major problem arose when the final versions of the songs were delivered and the editor found they were slower in tempo than the demos used on set and consequently the dance sequences were out of time with the new recordings. After much concern that the film was in jeopardy, a way was eventually found by the sound editors, to sync the footage accurately with the final soundtrack. See more »

Goofs

When Tony first enters 2001 Odyssey, the doorman (gray vest, glasses) stamps his hand and Tony greets him. In the next shot, when Tony moves into the main hall, the doorman is already standing there and Tony shakes his hand. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Pizza Girl: Hi ya, Tony. Two or three?
Tony Manero: Two. Two. Give me two. That's good.
See more »

Crazy Credits

When the title appears on screen, it is done in the style of a neon sign. The word "Fever" is blinking. See more »

Alternate Versions

Saturday Night Fever has two ratings: The R-rated version is 118 minutes, it had contained the offensive language, nudity, and sexual content. In 1979, the film was re-issued as a 112 minute PG-rated version with extensive edits. This print removed all uses of 'fuck', 'cunt', 'shit', 'assholes', 'Jesus' and sexual dialogue references, as well as editing shots of the topless dancer, sex scenes in the car (notably the repeated rape of Annette), a groin kick and a head beating during the fight sequence, a shot of Tony waking and scratching his groin, and a closeup shot of a woman's breast on the poster in Tony's bedroom. See more »

Connections

Featured in Precious Images (1986) See more »

Soundtracks

More Than a Woman
Courtesy of RSO Records, Inc., Stigwood Music, Inc. (Unichappell Music, Inc.) BMI and Bros. Gibb, B.V.
Written by Barry Gibb, Robin Gibb and Maurice Gibb
Performed by Tavares
See more »

User Reviews

 
I Don't See Anyone Givin You A Raise Down At Unemployment
5 January 2006 | by Bandit1974See all my reviews

I am 31 so I was 3 when this movie came out. The first time I saw Saturday Night Fever was the "Edited For Television" version probably when I was 6 or 7 years old. At that point, it was about the music, the dance scenes and the clothes.

It wouldn't be until years later that I understood what a great story this is. It's a coming of age movie. It's a modern day tragedy. It's a love story.

The first thing that people think about when they hear Saturday Night Fever is disco and bell bottoms, but the story is timeless. Travolta plays Tony Manero, a loser in a nowhere job who only feels alive when he is on the dance floor at the local disco. There he is adored by his friends, by women and by strangers. There he is king. Everywhere else he is nobody. Even at home.

Tony becomes infatuated with a woman named Stephanie. On the surface Stephanie appears to be much better off than Tony. For the most part Stephanie is a big talker, but Tony is bothered by her observations.

"Let me guess. You work all week long at some dead end job and then you go and blow it at all at 2001 (the disco) on the weekends. You're a cliché. You're no one, going nowhere." As much as Tony is upset by her words he can't argue with them. Soon Tony becomes frustrated with his "station in life" and tells Stephanie he wants out (of Brooklyn).

What makes Saturday Night Fever work so much for me is Tony is very typical of a lot of males who would rather have a good time and party now than build something toward the future. Bars are full of guys like Tony. Guys who are super stars in their local drinking establishments, but have no life outside of the night life.

And of course there's the superb dance scenes that most people remember Saturday Night Fever for. The soundtrack is also one of the best out there.

For whatever reason, Saturday Night Fever also has my favorite closing shot of all time. It's really nothing special, but I get choked up every time I see it.

Saturday Night Fever is also a snapshot of a period in recent American history. The movie took place in 1977. The country was a mess after the Vitenam war ended and before Reagan stormed Washington and once again instilled a sense of pride in Americans. There was no longer a war to protest, but the average American didn't have much faith in our country. I think Saturday Night Fever does an excellent job of capturing what was probably a common attitude among young adults during the late 70's. Live for the moment because the future is pretty bleak.


110 of 127 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you? | Report this
Review this title | See all 265 user reviews »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more »
Edit

Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Italian

Release Date:

16 December 1977 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Saturday Night See more »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$3,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$3,878,099, 18 December 1977

Gross USA:

$94,213,184

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$237,113,184
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (PG)

Sound Mix:

Dolby (as Dolby System)

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
See full technical specs »

Contribute to This Page



Recently Viewed