The life of boxer Jake LaMotta, whose violence and temper that led him to the top in the ring destroyed his life outside of it.

Director:

Martin Scorsese

Writers:

Jake LaMotta (based on the book by) (as Jake La Motta), Joseph Carter (with) | 3 more credits »
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Popularity
1,838 ( 284)
Top Rated Movies #148 | Won 2 Oscars. Another 22 wins & 28 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Robert De Niro ... Jake La Motta
Cathy Moriarty ... Vickie La Motta
Joe Pesci ... Joey
Frank Vincent ... Salvy
Nicholas Colasanto ... Tommy Como
Theresa Saldana ... Lenore
Mario Gallo ... Mario
Frank Adonis ... Patsy
Joseph Bono Joseph Bono ... Guido
Frank Topham Frank Topham ... Toppy
Lori Anne Flax ... Irma
Charles Scorsese ... Charlie - Man with Como
Don Dunphy Don Dunphy ... Self - Radio Announcer for Dauthuille Fight
Bill Hanrahan Bill Hanrahan ... Eddie Eagan
Rita Bennett Rita Bennett ... Emma - Miss 48's
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Storyline

When Jake LaMotta steps into a boxing ring and obliterates his opponent, he's a prizefighter. But when he treats his family and friends the same way, he's a ticking time bomb, ready to go off at any moment. Though LaMotta wants his family's love, something always seems to come between them. Perhaps it's his violent bouts of paranoia and jealousy. This kind of rage helped make him a champ, but in real life, he winds up in the ring alone. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Genres:

Biography | Drama | Sport

Certificate:

R | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Michelle Pfeiffer auditioned unsuccessfully for a supporting role with Robert De Niro in Los Angeles. See more »

Goofs

In a shot that introduces Jake's post-boxing life in Florida, the license tags of his two Cadillacs are shown in close-up. One of the Florida plates bears a "5" prefix, which in the 1950s indicated an automobile registered in Polk County (Lakeland). If Jake was living in the Miami area, it's far more likely his automobiles were registered in Dade County (prefix "1") or perhaps Broward ("10"), but not in a county 150 miles away. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Jake La Motta: I remember those cheers / They still ring in my ears / After years, they remain in my thoughts. / Go to one night / I took off my robe, and what'd I do? I forgot to wear shorts. / I recall every fall / Every hook, every jab / The worst way a guy can get rid of his flab. / As you know, my life wasn't drab. / Though I'd much... Though I'd rather hear you cheer / When you delve... Though I'd rather hear you cheer / When I delve into Shakespeare / "A horse, a horse, my kingdom for a ...
[...]
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Crazy Credits

The film is in black and white, but during the opening credits, the title is in red letters. See more »

Alternate Versions

Several years ago, the cable channel, Turner Classic Movies showed a very skillfully edited print of Raging Bull, removing all the profanity. Turner Classic Movies no longer edits its films, so if Raging Bull is ever shown again on that channel, it will be the uncut "R" rated version. See more »

Connections

Featured in The Killing of John Lennon (2006) See more »

Soundtracks

Webster Hall
Music and Lyrics by Garth Hudson
Musicians: Garth Hudson (Piano & Sax), Richard Manuel (Drums), Larry Klein (Bass) and Dale Turner (Trumpet: Oingo Boing Band)
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User Reviews

 
It doesn't get much better than this
25 November 2002 | by walterglSee all my reviews

Easily one of the most powerful films I have ever seen. I have watched it at least ten times, and it only gets better and better with each viewing. Martin Scorsese is absolutely the greatest filmmaker of the last quarter century, and this film is his best. The story of how boxer Jake LaMotta watched his career and marriage crumble under the weight of his violent temper and deep-rooted misogyny is told with no punches pulled (excuse the bad pun), as Deniro (in what may be his best performance) and Scorsese unflinchingly explore what drove this man over the edge, and what ultimately may have pulled him back. The boxing scenes easily rank with the most brutal and violent moments ever put on film, shot in stark, unadorned black and white and utilizing unlikely sounds including shattering windows and animal cries to great effect. Thelma Schoonmaker's jarring, discordant editing in these scenes also deserves special mention. The scenes of domestic violence are not for the faint of heart, but there is really no other way to tell this story. If there is a more perfect exploration of why as men we act the way we do, then I'd love to see it, because this movie made me re-evaluate my life. 10/10


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA

Language:

English

Release Date:

19 December 1980 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Raging Bull See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$18,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$128,590, 16 November 1980

Gross USA:

$23,383,987

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$23,402,427
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TV)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Stereo

Color:

Black and White | Color (home movies)

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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