5.4/10
7,664
50 user 23 critic

Intersection (1994)

Trailer
1:41 | Trailer
While driving on a remote highway, a man is torn between choosing to reunite with his estranged wife or taking up with his lovers

Director:

Mark Rydell

Writers:

David Rayfiel (screenplay), Marshall Brickman (screenplay) | 4 more credits »
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2 wins. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Richard Gere ... Vincent Eastman
Sharon Stone ... Sally Eastman
Lolita Davidovich ... Olivia Marshak
Martin Landau ... Neal
David Selby ... Richard Quarry
Jennifer Morrison ... Meaghan Eastman (as Jenny Morrison)
Ron White ... Charlie
Matthew Walker ... Surgeon
Scott Bellis ... Van Driver
Patricia Harras ... Van Driver's Wife
Keegan MacIntosh Keegan MacIntosh ... Van Driver's Son (as Keegan Macintosh)
A.C. Peterson ... Semi-Driver (as Alan C. Peterson)
Sandra P. Grant Sandra P. Grant ... Receptionist
Robyn Stevan ... Step Magazine
David Hurtubise David Hurtubise ... Step Magazine (as Dave Hurtubise)
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Storyline

Vincent Eastman has to choose between his wife of 16 years, Sally, and his new love, Olivia. Frequent flashbacks explain the background to the marriage and the affair. Written by Rob Hartill

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Make every move as if it were your last.

Genres:

Drama | Romance

Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for some language and sexuality | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although the location of the story is not specified, the filming locations were in Canada. There are numerous references to Canada throughout the movie. As Richard Gere is driving to the museum there is a billboard that reads 200 meters to the cafe. Canada follows the metric system. Another instance is a Canadian flag is displayed outside the shop when Richard Gere's character runs into the "red head" little girl with the pastries. A nice touch or connection to the region of filming, Richard Gere's character designed a museum honoring the natives of the region. See more »

Goofs

When Vincent washes his face after arriving at the diner he looks wistfully at his reflection in the bathroom mirror. A member of the crew is visible behind him. See more »

Quotes

Neal: Everybody has to work for somebody. Even Michael-Angelo had to please the Pope.
Vincent Eastman: The Pope didn't ask for parking space
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Connections

Remake of The Things of Life (1970) See more »

Soundtracks

Sonata in G Minor - First Movement
By Johann Sebastian Bach (as J.S. Bach)
Performed by Irena Grafenauer, Maria Graf & David Geringas
Courtesy of Philips Classics
By Arrangement with PolyGram Special Markets
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User Reviews

Never makes it across the intersection...
1 September 2002 | by tigerman2001See all my reviews

I'm not quite sure what this movie's about. I'm not saying that I suspect that I missed some deep, subtle secret concealed within the narrative that only a select few will ever grasp (this, I assume, is true of the alleged comedy that I've missed in various 'comedic' films) -- rather, I'm just not entirely sure that this film delivers what it might have had it had a more coherent flow and some semblance of actually going anywhere. Not that that sentence that I just penned is a great example of those qualities, but I digress...

The movie features fine performances from all involved, including Lolia Davidovich and Sharon Stone and the pretty-much-always excellent Richard Gere. Gere's character is convincing and real, but perhaps a tad too real because he's a pretty wishy-washy fellow and his is not the most compelling of roles. Then again, neither is anyone else's, really. The two female leads get marginally more to wrap their skills around, but the whole is way less than the sum of its parts.

A 98-minute film, "Intersection" seems a lot longer and I found myself calculating time-elapsed and time-remaining at more than one point. Hardly a good sign. Sure, there are no Ramboesque explosions and car chases (though a high-speed driving theme is at the movie's heart) but I'm not the type of male who has to have that kind of thing to keep me engaged. A story might be nice, though. I mean, a story that hangs together. In the absence of much direction, and in the presence of multiple and confusing layers of flashback, the actors' great work is sabotaged. It just doesn't really seem to go anywhere.

When the film finished I felt the sentiment echoed in that old Peggy Lee song..."Is that all there is?" And I don't like Peggy Lee, darn it!


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Frequently Asked Questions

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Details

Country:

USA | Canada

Language:

English

Release Date:

21 January 1994 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

The Things of Life See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$45,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$7,818,502, 23 January 1994

Gross USA:

$21,355,893

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$21,355,893
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

Paramount Pictures See more »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Dolby SR

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.85 : 1
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