7.1/10
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Nixon (1995)

A biographical story of former U.S. President Richard Nixon, from his days as a young boy, to his eventual Presidency, which ended in shame.

Director:

Oliver Stone
Nominated for 4 Oscars. Another 11 wins & 14 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Anthony Hopkins ... Richard M. Nixon
Joan Allen ... Pat Nixon
Powers Boothe ... Alexander Haig
Ed Harris ... E. Howard Hunt
Bob Hoskins ... J. Edgar Hoover
E.G. Marshall ... John Mitchell
David Paymer ... Ron Ziegler
David Hyde Pierce ... John Dean
Paul Sorvino ... Henry Kissinger
Mary Steenburgen ... Hannah Nixon
J.T. Walsh ... John Ehrlichman
James Woods ... H.R. Haldeman
Brian Bedford ... Clyde Tolson
Kevin Dunn ... Charles Colson
Fyvush Finkel ... Murray Chotiner
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Storyline

Writer, Producer, and Director Oliver Stone's exploration of former President Richard Nixon's strict Quaker upbringing, his nascent political strivings in law school, and his strangely self-effacing courtship of his wife, Pat (Joan Allen). The contradictions in his character are revealed early, in the vicious campaign against Helen Gahagan Douglas and the oddly masochistic Checkers speech. His defeat at the hands of the hated and envied John F. Kennedy in the 1960 presidential election, followed by the loss of the 1962 California gubernatorial race, seem to signal the end of his career. Yet, although wholly lacking in charisma, Nixon remains a brilliant political operator, seizing the opportunity provided by the backlash against the antiwar movement to take the Presidency in 1968. It is only when safely in office, running far ahead in the polls for the 1972 Presidential election, that his growing paranoia comes to full flower, triggering the Watergate scandal. Written by alfiehitchie

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Triumphant in Victory, Bitter in Defeat. He Changed the World, But Lost a Nation. See more »


Motion Picture Rating (MPAA)

Rated R for language | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

View content advisory »
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Sir Anthony Hopkins and Bob Hoskins appeared in Othello (1981) and Mussolini and I (1985). See more »

Goofs

The road Nixon is traveling along to get to the ranch in 1972 has yellow markings. At that time, although the USA was replacing the white ones, country roads would have not been changed, and even if it had been changed, the marking would not have been faded. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
Earl in Training Film: I just don't understand it.
See more »

Alternate Versions

Letterbox video version features additional outtake footage, including a scene starring Sam Waterston as CIA director Richard Helms. See more »

Connections

References Citizen Kane (1941) See more »

Soundtracks

HACKNEY CARRIAGE
Written by C. King Palmer
[Played during the training film at the beginning]
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User Reviews

 
Oliver Stone's best film
1 February 2000 | by krumskiSee all my reviews

I'm not normally a fan of Oliver Stone (in fact, I've NEVER liked an Oliver Stone picture before)but this one just blew me away. The reason I usually don't like him is that, though he is a great technical director and visual stylist, his scripts are heavy-handed and one-sided to the point of absurdity. But not here. In fact, the script is perhaps the most impressive element in this whole movie, not only for how ambiguous and even-handed it is in dealing with Nixon as a character, but also for the brilliant way it moves around in time. It starts with Nixon, feeling embattled in the White House in 1973 as the Watergate hearings are upon him, and uses the device of him listening to his secret tapes to jump back and forth to previous eras, flawlessly moving between past and present to give an impressionistic, kaleidoscopic overview of the man's life, instead of following the staid and ho-hum linear approach most movie biographies take (most recent example: "Man on the Moon", the bio on Andy Kaufman which was a snoozer in spite of a great performance by Jim Carrey mainly because of the dry boring, "This happened. . .And then this happened" approach).

Another reason to see this film is the brilliant, absolutely overwhelming lead performance by Anthony Hopkins; his Nixon may not look or sound exactly like the 37th president (but come on, except maybe for Ed Sullivan, who does?) but he embodies his qualities - strengths as well as weaknesses - to such an enormous degree that he simply BECOMES Nixon, at least for the three hours the movie is on screen.

I have to say, though, I was not nearly as impressed as every one else (critics and general audiences alike) seems to be about Joan Allen as Pat Nixon. It's nothing against her performance, she did fine, it's just that as written, the part is rather weak. In fact, I was much more bothered about the liberties the filmmakers took in fleshing out her character than in all the political events; it's like, whenever they wanted to have someone blast Nixon or act as his conscience, they'd trot out Ol' Pat, giving her some of the most embarrasingly "speechified" moments in all of the movies - almost none of their scenes together ringed true as husband as wife; it was more like Nixon sitting across from the Filmmakers' Conscience. In fact, she's angry at him so often in the film you have to wonder, what exactly does she love about the man? The film never answers (or attempts to answer) this question.

But this one minor quibble is not enough to make me downgrade this film. It is an absolutely stunning achievement by any stretch of the imagination, and it contains some interesting thematic and technical echoes of both Citizen Kane (cavernous high ceiling scenes, a "March of Time"-type newsreel on Nixon, a dinner scene between Dick and Pat at a long, impersonal table) as well as The Godfather (the burnished, half-dark half-light cinematography, several "chamber of power" scenes in tight, dark and claustrophobic rooms)that I found, in context, to be totally appropriate. It paints both Nixon and the times he (and the country) lived through on a grand and mythic scale that was truly awesome and, once again, entirely appropriate. Yes, it's a film that is at times big, loud and bombastic (because so, after all, was Nixon himself) but, just as often quiet, contemplative and told at an achingly *human* level. The contrast between these two states is what gives the film a good deal of its overall power and, as I've said, I never would have believed that Stone would have been capable of doing the smaller, quieter scenes so well.

This is a good film to have on tape or DVD, for two reasons. It's so long, and so dense with facts, characters and events, that you're not likely to want to watch it all the way straight through (the first time I saw it was in the theater and though I was held spellbound, I began wishing for an intermission at about the two-hour mark, not so much to stretch my legs but to give my brain a chance to process all I'd seen and heard so far). Also, and more importantly, the videotape includes after the credits two scenes cut out of the final film for time purposes. In both cases, I believe, a severe mistake was made - these are both, I believe, ESSENTIAL sequences; not just nice to have as an additional bargain, but scenes which Stone should have fought tooth and nail to keep in (even cutting out some others if he had to - my vote would have been to excise a few of those Pat Nixon scenes instead). Once scene involves Nixon's visit to the CIA and another a discussion between Nixon and J. Edgar Hoover in the Oval Office. The first scene is a masterpiece of writing and acting (with Sam Waterston as CIA Director Richard Helms, otherwise in no other scene of the movie) and the other is, I think, key in understanding Nixon's motivation to begin taping his White House conversations in the first place (also - an issue which is touched on no other place in the movie). I feel that these two scenes should be edited back into their appropriate places in the movie; seeing them separated from the rest of the film is better than not seeing them at all, but they really belong as part of the entire story.


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Details

Official Sites:

Oliver Stone Official Site

Country:

USA

Language:

English | Mandarin | Russian

Release Date:

5 January 1996 (USA) See more »

Also Known As:

Nixon See more »

Filming Locations:

California, USA See more »

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Box Office

Budget:

$44,000,000 (estimated)

Opening Weekend USA:

$2,206,506, 25 December 1995

Gross USA:

$13,681,765

Cumulative Worldwide Gross:

$13,681,765
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Show more on IMDbPro »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (director's cut)

Sound Mix:

Dolby Digital

Color:

Color (archive footage)| Black and White (archive footage)| Black and White | Color

Aspect Ratio:

2.39 : 1
See full technical specs »

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