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The Alamo (2004) Poster

(2004)

Goofs

Anachronisms 

The defenders of the Alamo, near the start of the movie, are singing "Listen to the Mockingbird." The Alamo siege took place in 1836 and "Listen to the Mockingbird" was written by Septimus Winner under the name of Alice Hawthrone and copyrighted in April 1855, 19 years after the siege of the Alamo.
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Continuity 

Right after Crockett shoots the epaulet off Santa Ana's right shoulder, he can be seen stepping back with epaulets on both shoulders. The next time the camera shows him, he only has the epaulet on his left shoulder.
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At one point, Bowie pulls his famous knife out of the sheath and allows Crockett to examine it. When the camera cuts back to Bowie, his knife is back in its sheath, despite the fact that Crockett is still holding it.
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When Lt. Colonel Travis is departing from the house where he drops his son off, we see Joe, his slave, standing next to his horse. In the next shot, Joe is already mounted.
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When Crockett is setting fire to the out building to clear the field of fire, a Mexican soldier jumps out to attack Crockett and is promptly shot by Colonel Travis from the Rampart. A stunned Crockett turns to the Rampart which appears 30-40 feet behind him. Colonel Travis is shown lowering his rifle having fired the shot that killed the soldier. Crockett, having acknowledged the saving shot, turns his head forward towards the dead soldier, but over his shoulder the Alamo now appears 100 to 150ft away from where he stands.
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When Lt. Colonel Travis is leaving the house where he drops his son off, the knot on the rope on his son's hat changes sides between shots.
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Crew or equipment visible 

In the scene before Travis asks the black guys to dig a new well; behind the two Alamo men discussing what's changed during the night, you can see a crew member in white T-shirt and white trainers walking backwards in the distance.
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Factual errors 

In March of 1836, Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna was about 42 years old. Emilio Echevarria, while his birth date is publicly unknown, is (visibly) significantly older, not close to resembling how Santa Anna looked at the time.
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The the Final Battle, most of the Mexican soldiers look like they are waiting for a attack. In actuality, most of the Mexican Soldiers had been asleep or let their guard down when the Texians began their surprise attack.
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Incorrectly regarded as goofs 

Unlike most depictions, which have Crockett killed at the battle on the Alamo, there is an account by a Mexican soldier (that was translated into English after several depictions were made) who recognized Crockett and saw him executed as a prisoner of war after the battle.
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Revealing mistakes 

When Davy Crockett goes to shoot at Santa Ana, he only half-cocks his rifle. This acts like a safety and would prevent him from firing.
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This movie accurately portrays the Alamo without its iconic bell-shaped facade atop the front wall of the church. That was added by the U.S. Army in 1850, 14 years after the battle. The John Wayne 1960 version made a half-hearted attempt to recreate the facade as it exists now, but in fact, the roof of the church was flat all the way across in 1836.
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The shell defused by Travis is too large to have been fired by any of the Mexican guns.
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When Crockett plays the fiddle to play during the "Slit Throat" march, it is perfectly in tune, though presumably he hasn't played the instrument in days and began playing with no time to tune it.
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As the Texians overrun the Mexican line at San Jacinto, General Castrillon crosses his arms with his sword in his right hand. As he strikes his pose, his sword flutters quite a bit, and the blade even appears to be warped. Hardly something anyone would take into a fight.
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The movie Alamo chapel is about 50 feet too deep into the compound. Look at the convento [correct spelling] wall at the Alamo plaza for confirmation.
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When Jim Bowie returns to his home in San Antonio, he enters the courtyard and stands for a moment. While standing there a light turns on illuminating part of the back wall.
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When Houston and his men are charging Santa Anna's army there is a shot of a man being shot and falling to the ground. Midway through his fall the shot cuts to another take and the man jumps from one part of the frame to another and the people in the background change.
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Spoilers

The goof item below may give away important plot points.

Factual errors 

Juan Seguin is shown returning to the Alamo long after the battle and finding the bodies of those killed. In fact, Santa Ana had all the remains burned immediately after the battle and Seguin only found the ashes on the pyres, which he then buried.
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See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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