Doctor Who (1963–1989)
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The Stones of Blood: Part One 

On Earth to collect the third segment to the Key to Time, the Doctor and Romana encounter modern day druids in Cornwall making blood sacrifices to Cailleach, the goddess of war and magic, ... See full summary »

Director:

Darrol Blake

Writer:

David Fisher (by)
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Cast

Episode complete credited cast:
Tom Baker ... Doctor Who
Mary Tamm ... Romana
Beatrix Lehmann ... Professor Rumford
Susan Engel ... Vivien Fay
John Leeson ... K9 (voice)
Nicholas McArdle ... De Vries
Elaine Ives-Cameron Elaine Ives-Cameron ... Martha
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Storyline

On Earth to collect the third segment to the Key to Time, the Doctor and Romana encounter modern day druids in Cornwall making blood sacrifices to Cailleach, the goddess of war and magic, at a megalithic circle known as The Nine Travelers. The Tracer says the third segment is there, then says it isn't, which is very odd. Written by statmanjeff

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Details

Country:

UK

Language:

English

Release Date:

28 October 1978 (UK) See more »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Mono

Color:

Color

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

For location shooting, K-9 was equipped with a small microphone and speaker, so that John Leeson could hear and interact with the other actors from a van parked nearby. One day, while waiting for a scene to be set-up, Tom Baker sat down near K-9 and began working on the Times crossword (Leeson's hobby), conversing with Leeson through the remote link. Without thinking about it, Leeson remained in character. He was later told that several young fans, who had come by to watch the production, were quite amazed by what appeared to be the Doctor and K-9 working on the puzzle together. See more »

Quotes

The Doctor: [entering dwelling alone] Hello? Anybody home?
[silence]
The Doctor: Nobody home except us druids.
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Connections

Featured in Getting Blood from the Stones (2007) See more »

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User Reviews

 
By No Means A Classic But Slightly Better Than Other Tales From Its Era
12 January 2014 | by Theo RobertsonSee all my reviews

Searching for the third segment of the key to time the Doctor and Romana land in present day Cornwall and find themselves at the megalithic site of some standing stones which hold a dangerous , hidden secret

I can vividly remember the gut wrenching disappointment of watching season 16 on its original broadcast " What happened to the show that terrified me a few years earlier ? " . There was no doubt in my mind it was the show itself that had changed rather than a mendacity in my memories . Hindsight proved me right since the years 1967-77 did show the programme set up nightmarish scenarios of scary monsters against settings on present day Earth or far flung corners of the galaxy . From the Williams era onwards we get camp , silly space opera which is in danger of falling in to total parody

The Stones of Blood sees a brief return to the traditional type of story this fan knows and loves . In many ways its mix of monsters and mythology is similar to the previous season's Image Of The Fendahl but where as Image went out of its way to terrify the audience here the punches are pulled somewhat as if the production team didn't want to get in to any more trouble from concerned parents , but does contain some very effective scenes such as a couple of campers finding ancient stones standing outside their tent . . Such a pity all four episodes didn't concentrate on this and you're left with the nagging feeling that you're watching two stories grafted on to one another in a structure that doesn't really gel which let's the story down somewhat

That said for the 100th story of classic DOCTOR WHO it is fitting that we're treated to a more traditional type of story and despite the numerous flaws we are treated to the occasional spine chilling moment and we get to meet Professor Rumford played well by Beatrix Lehmann one of the more colourful characters from the season but unlike the other larger than life characters seen this year she's a character grounded in reality . It's also interesting that so many of the characters seen in this story are female which is a nice counterpoint to the criticism that classic DOCTOR WHO is a painfully mysoginistic show


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