Waxwork II: Lost in Time (1992) Poster

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9/10
SERIOUS FUN
tomaxxamot27 June 2004
If you don't have a sense of humor or an appreciation for classic horror you won't like this film. It's a montage of homage that is devoted to capturing the pace, direction style, acting style, dialogue etc. of such films as Alien, The Haunting, Dawn of The Dead, Nosferatu on a relatively low budget. The pared down scenes accentuate the spoof sentiment and remind us why horror is fun. Take the Alien scene, hard talking', pulse rifle carrying space marines complete with transmission samples as background juxtaposed to the reefer madness-esque black and white, highly stylized scene of The Haunting. Battling evil can be funny and Bruce Campbell's cameo, as well as others, lends support. If nothing else, it's a treasure hunt for horror genre fans.
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8/10
A Great Homage Flick
Gislef18 January 1999
Waxwork II pays homage to so many genres of horror that half the fun is watching them and trying to catch what's going on. The plot isn't much, but there's lots of laughs mixed in (particularly Bruce Campbell, in the Hell House segment). There's a real sense that the producers and writer are having fun with a concept that really didn't need a sequel in the first place, so they said the heck with it and decided to do whatever they felt like.
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5/10
Back to the Past
claudio_carvalho5 March 2014
Warning: Spoilers
Mark (Zach Galligan) and Sarah (Monika Schnarre) survive to the fire in the wax museum, but Sarah is followed by a severed hand that kills her alcoholic stepfather. Sarah becomes the prime suspect and goes to trial. Mark and Sarah search evidence to prove her innocence and they go to Sir Wilfred's house. They find a footage prepared by Sir Wilfred with a puzzle based of the Alice and the Looking Glass. They solve the puzzle and find a compass that opens portals through time. They travel to the most different places in time seeking something to help Sarah in her trial in a dangerous journey.

"Waxwork II: Lost in Time" is the sequel of "Waxwork" without Deborah Foreman that turned the offer down and was replaced by Monika Schnarre in the role of Sarah. Zach Galligan is also different from the original clumsy and rich Mark. The movie pays a tribute to several horror movies and entertains but it is silly and does not work well in many parts. The conclusion is a rip-off "Back to the Future" and does not make much sense that Sarah comes back to the present days to clear her name and return to the past to stay with Mark. My vote is five.

Title (Brazil): "Waxwork II - Perdidos no Tempo" ("Waxwork II: Lost in Time")
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10/10
Ah.... the good old days..
darenwheeler26 November 2005
The good old days, when horror didn't have to be a) Ironic b) Overtly gory or c) Pychologically damaging. The good old days when a horror movie could make you laugh out loud at it's plain stupidity and low budget. In fact if it didn't say 1992 on the label you'd swear this was a vintage 80's comedy horror. This is a film that revels in it's low budget; in fact it doesn't so much revel it basks in it, bathes in it even.. Yes the acting is suspect but then I'd be worried if it was up for acting awards. The tongue is firmly stuck in the cheek. In short, Lost In Time is fun. It won't cure cancer, it won't win Oscars but it'll make you laugh and it'll take you back to a time when horror could be fun. Ask yourself, when was the last time Horror did that intentionally? 8/10 And a special mention for director Anthony Hickox. Just why isn't he doing bigger films?
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8/10
Great fun to be had as it goes from one story to another.
Aaron13755 July 2005
This movie follows a guy and gal through their adventures in a realm where good is constantly fighting evil and it seems to take the form of old horror movies for the most part. There is a lot of fun to be had as they go into this mirror world in search of the means to prove the girl's innocence from a bizarre murder. They first enter a sort of Frankenstien story and this one is pretty good, then they separate and the female goes into an Alien type movie, which I found to be sort of weak, but the guy goes into the highlight for me, an old haunted house tale with a very funny Bruce Campbell. The scene with the salt and lemon juice had me laughing good. Then it wraps up with the longest of the stories one in a medieval era with a crazed psycho trying to take power through strange means. This one runs a little long, but it has another great set of scenes as our hero battles the villain through several worlds. This movie has a great combo of horror, comedy and action and is a very good B movie.
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8/10
Delightfully silly sequel to the enjoyable original
Woodyanders14 March 2012
Warning: Spoilers
Writer/director Anthony Hickox cheerfully throws logic, basic sense, and seriousness completely to the wind in this gloriously asinine sequel which finds lone survivors Mark (affable Zach Gilligan) and Sarah (winningly played with considerable spunky charm by the gorgeous Monika Schnarre) traveling through a time portal and getting thrust into a crazy alternate universe where the forces of good and evil battle it out for all eternity. Cranking up the blithely dippy black humor to the gut-busting ninth degree, laying on a handy helping of graphic gore, and paying merry homage to a slew of classic horror items that include "Alien," "The Haunting," "Frankenstein," "Nosferatu," "Godzilla," and "Dawn of the Dead," Hickox takes the viewer on a giddy fantasy adventure that's admittedly cheesy as all hell, but still quite funny and entertaining thanks to its boundless energy and all-out unapologetic stupidity. Alexander Godunov has a ball as wicked black arts practitioner Scarabis, Martin Kemp does well as Baron Frankenstein, and Michael Des Barres is a slimy treat as effeminate baddie George. Popping up in nifty bits are Bruce Campbell (in stellar spirited deadpan form and sporting a nasty open chest wound), David Carradine, Patrick Macnee (briefly back as the jolly Sir Wilfred), John Ireland (in his last movie role as King Arthur), Drew Barrymore, and George "Buck" Flower (who gets killed by a lethal disembodied hand!). The ending credits rap song and accompanying video is simply sidesplitting. Gerry Lively's polished cinematography gives the picture a crisp high-gloss look. Steve Schiff's neatly varied and robust score does the thrilling and flavorful trick. Tremendous goofy fun.
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7/10
Nonsense Beginning to End
gavin694224 February 2012
Mark and Sarah survived the mayhem from the first movie only to have Sarah on trial for a murder committed by a dismembered hand. To find the proof that will clear her, the pair travel through time and space to dimensions full of historical, movie, and book characters.

With guest appearances by Bruce Campbell and David Carradine, how can you go wrong? Especially with such intense homages to "Dawn of the Dead", "The Haunting" and more?

If any complaint can be lodged with this film, it is that it is complete nonsense. The logic is even more goofy than the last film (which was pretty bad), the continuity is non-existent, and it does not really follow the first film except in the most vague way... but if you do not mind completely malarkey, this movie is fun.
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8/10
Ridiculously Good
guzzil8031 December 2010
I can't believe that there are any users who take life so seriously as to give this movie a bad review. Don't listen to the naysayers! Awesome cameos by cult favorites like Bruce Campbell, Drew Barrymore, and David Carradine. This movie tackles multiple genres in irreverent and entertaining style. In my opinion this is better than the original, although Sarah in the original movie was much cuter. If your idea of a good start to a Sunday is eating Grape Nuts, taking a jog, and then coming home to button up and put on a tie on your day off stay away. Otherwise, grab yourself drink, a snack, skip the shower, and be a bum with this flick. Perfect.
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* * * out of 4.
brandonsites19819 August 2002
Sharply written & original sequel has the two survivors from the first film traveling back in time to prove that the heroine from the first film did not kill her father, but that a demonic hand did. While, in the past they run into a warlock who has the ability to change his appearance. Fast paced, stylish, and exciting sequel with some rather good moments and plenty of homage to classic horror movies. An improvement over the original film.

Rated R; Violence and Profanity.
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7/10
Shlocky Good Time
slodaddio7 October 2009
This movie did not follow in the trends of the typical sequel by sucking hard. Let's say it's more Empire Strikes Back than Jaws 2. Okay, that's a bit of a stretched comparison, but whatever - it was a rollicking good time.

First of all, this is not a movie to take seriously in any way. It's an homage to various horror movies and it has more cheese than Wisconsin. Some of the content you'll encounter: animated murderous hands, Frankenstein, zombies, aliens, black magic druids,...and more! I would love to see this movie re-imagined as a musical (a la Evil Dead).

WWII (uh, WaxWorks 2) gets extra points for guest appearances from Bruce "The Man Bull" Campbell (just made up that nickname for him) and Keith "Masturbation Strangulation" Carradine (nickname not made up). Set aside your critical mind for the dramas, for this campy feature all you need to do is cook yourself up some Jiffy Pop, kick back, and prepare to be moderately entertained. Oh, and the 90's sucktacular rap video during the end credits is a hoot. You'll be dumbstruck by smoove lyrics such as "Lost in time, Like a bug in a jar. No matter where you go- YO- there you are"
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10/10
Hilarious, especially for horror fans
ashspicefilms27 September 2000
Hilarious to anyone, but even more if you've seen the numerous horror movies it spoofs, from Haunting to Dawn of the Dead. I haven't seen the original, so seeing it isn't really necesary to watch this crowd-pleasing film. The opening 10 minutes makes the film appear a lot darker than it really is. Once you see Frankenstien battle his monster, you know you have what should be a horror classic. Many people don't like this film, but I think it's great. it even has the best actor of all time, bruce Campbell, in it! What more could you ask for?
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6/10
Amusing silliness...
Rob_Taylor18 September 2005
Warning: Spoilers
Waxworks 2 doesn't pretend to be anything other than what it is. A comic parody of horror movies. If you haven't got that by the time the crawling hand picks up the hammer, then you ain't gonna like this movie.

Not that the movie is great, by any stretch of the imagination. The type of humour is a little too dated to bring much more than smiles. But it does entertain.

Throw in cameo performances from a host of well-known stars (well..they're well-known now, anyway) and you have a pleasant enough way to spend an evening.

In fact, playing spot the jobbing actor is a good way to look at this movie, if you aren't certain it's for you. With the likes of Bruce Campbell, David Carradine and Marina Sirtis all popping up at one point or another, there's no shortage of faces on display that even a non-filmy will recognize.

The highlight of the movie is the final showdown between hero and villain, where they clash swords across a number of "dimensions", all of which are parodies of well-known movies, with a number of obvious, but well-done gags thrown in at the appropriate point.

It's not a movie you'll bring out of the TV cabinet again and again to watch, but it's fun enough for a single viewing.
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8/10
Better than the first, and completely underrated as a genre flick.
The-Evil-Dead28 June 2009
It's not very often that you can catch a horror film that pays so much homage to the genre that is actually enjoyable and not completely painstaking. Whomever was behind the concept of this film and script were clearly have a good time, and personally I thought it turned out very well.

Despite the fact that it wasn't a huge budgeted release, everything holds up. It's the imagination that goes into the script ( Yeah, it's all a spin off of other films, but done very well. ) that really brings a cool energy to this film. It'll have you munching on the popcorn.

If you're a genre fan, you will get a smirk out of this film. If you don't, I guess you're one of the types that can't have a good time with the horror concept being tossed around into the realm of satire and comedy as it is in this film.

I'm really surprised there's not a bit more buzz about this film. I think it's a true cult classic and absolutely surpasses the first in every way. Do what is in your power to see this film if you haven't.
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7/10
Over the top horror parodies
leathaface29 May 2007
Warning: Spoilers
The sequel to Waxwork 2 pales in comparison with the first but still manages to be a campy and bloody good time. After the museum from the original is destroyed, a disembodied hand escapes and murders someone, and Loftmore and his girlfriend are tried as they were at the scene when it happened. They have to travel back in time to prevent the museum explosion from the past. Bad plot, but what happens for the rest of the movie more than makes up for it. What we then have is about an hour or so of classic horror/sci-fi movie parodies. First stop is Frankenstein's castle. Frankenstein gets loose in the basement and slowly, deliberately and painfully crushes the Dr.'s head. I'm talking teeth grinding to pinkish-white chunks, a tongue bitten in half, eyes popping out (complete with cartoony sound effects) blood oozing from every opening, then lastly a brain exploding out of his skull and flying through the air a la Evil Dead 2. Much like the first gory scene in the original when the kid is ripped in half vertically by the werewolf, the film throws it right out there near the beginning so you know what to expect. There are some really great and humorous parodies, with some surprising cameo appearances. Bruce Campbell, Drew Barrymore, David Carradine are a few you may recognize. The special effects provided by Bob Keen (Hellraiser and the original Waxwork) range from decent to intentionally fake (aforementioned headcrushing scene.) This one is good, gory, and over the top but unrelated to the first, it's better to watch this one before you've seen Waxwork.
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4/10
A cheap and unnecessary film-riffing sequel
Leofwine_draca18 August 2016
Warning: Spoilers
This highly disappointing follow-up to 1989's WAXWORK is more of a slapdash rehash than a sequel. The dumb and inexcusable plot sees Galligan and Schnarre going back through time for more of the same, this time to find a piece of evidence to convince a local court that Schnarre wasn't responsible for the murder of her father. Contrived isn't the right work; downright silly would be a better bet. From the first moment that this film opens, you realise the strictly low budget of the production through the poor picture quality and cheap-looking sets. It's certainly not a patch on the lively and entertaining original movie.

The first episode is a re-run of the Frankenstein story, with the creature here an unscary straggly-haired beast covered in a prosthetic face. How very '90s. Playing the mad "Baron Von Frankenstein" is none other than Martin Kemp, member of Spandau Ballet and more familiar today as a regular on the TV soap EASTENDERS. Kemp is definitely slumming it in this film, as he did for most of the early '90s, and it's highly amusing to watch him embarrass himself here. He just isn't cut out for the part, and fails to be the least bit frenzied or frightening. The only highlight of this otherwise nondescript episode comes at the schlocky end, when Kemp's eyeballs pop out followed by his brain. The ultra-cheap special effects are reviewed through the "bird's-eye view" of the brain flying through the air, as the stand on which it sits is plainly visible.

The second episode is probably the most fun, if only for the presence of comic genius and all-round good guy Bruce Campbell playing Richard Johnson's role in THE HAUNTING. The black and white photography is pleasingly different, if only copied from the first film, and there are some lame-brained yet fun slapstick moments involving Campbell being tortured in a basement. Sadly this is over far too quickly, although eagle-eyed fans may spot Marina Sirtis as the woman playing "Gloria" in the segment.

The third story is a dreadful rip-off of ALIEN, with some really bad special effects in the shape of the lame, rubbery aliens. Whoever designed these should be shot outright. Disorientating camera-work means that it's damn near impossible to see here what's going on, so the sooner its over the better. The fourth instalment is by far the longest, and thus the most boring. This time Galligan and his girlfriend are sent back to Britain in the medieval period, where they become trapped in the castle of the cruel lord Scarabis. While the plot here is passable stuff, and there are fine supporting turns from Alexander Godunov (excellently nasty as the villain, as he was in DIE HARD) and John Ireland (as King Arthur, no less) nothing much really happens aside from a few more disappointing prosthetic attempts at monsters.

It's at the end of this tale that the film suddenly picks up, and copies SHOCKER again by having two characters fighting as they jump from location to location. Thus, we get to see some fun parodies of GODZILLA, DAWN OF THE DEAD (again) and also, by far the best, one of the original NOSFERATU, which is very funny. Drew Barrymore plays a victim in the bed if you can spot her. Events conclude in a boringly unbelievable anti-climax in which it looks simply like they ran out of money.

Linking scenes of Galligan and Schnarre flying through a "time tunnel" look like they've been ripped from EVIL DEAD II, and are quite stupid. The acting from the leads is also below par, with Schnarre just another forgettable 20-something actress who doesn't register at all, and Galligan simply going through the motions of his previous successes. The appearance of many stars in cameo roles (as well as the above people, David Carradine, Patrick Macnee, Joe Don Baker, and George "Buck" Flower also pop up briefly) does give this movie a watchability, as well as some of the brief moments in which the comedy actually works. Otherwise this is a cheap and unnecessary sequel in which even the special effects are pretty bad (ie. splattery and unrealistic-looking). My recommendation is to watch the first and give this one a miss!
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8/10
Great film, highly entertaining.
poolandrews28 January 2006
Warning: Spoilers
Waxwork II: Lost in Time starts with a brief recap of the climax to the original Waxwork (1988) paying particular attention to the escape of the severed zombie hand, Mark Loftmaore (Zach Galligan returning from the original) & Sarah Brightman (now played by Monika Schnarre) think they have ended David Lincoln's plan to flood the world with evil & catch a taxi home. Unfortunately the severed hand goes along for the ride too. Once home Sarah goes to bed & the severed hand attacks & kills her Stepfather (George 'Buck' Flower), Sarah is accused of his murder & is put on trial. Sensing an injustice & that she will be found guilty Mark & Sarah head over to Sir Wilfred's (Patrick Macnee) mansion who they discover has left a message for them, they find his hoard of ancient artifacts & something called Solomon's Lockett which turns out to be a key to open doors to alternate dimensions. With the idea that they can gain proof of Sarah's innocence by travelling through time & space they enter a time door & find themselves in Baron Von Frankensteins (Martin Kemp) castle facing an angry mob of local villagers who want Frankenstein & his monster (Stefanos Miltsakakis) dead & anyone associated with him...

Written & directed by Anthony Hickox, who also has a small cameo in the film, Waxwork II: Lost in Time is a worthy but not quite as good sequel to the great original. The script is one long homage & send-up to various other horror films but this time there are no waxworks involved. From the likes of Frankenstein (1931) to Alien (1979), Dawn of the Dead (1979), Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941), an awful Godzilla (1954) bit complete with terrible dubbing to add authenticity, Invasion of the Body Snatchers (1956), Jack the Ripper (1959), Nosferatu (1922) shot in black and white complete with subtitles & a jerky movement, The Haunting (1963), the severed hand attacking Sarah's Spetfather is taken straight from the sequence in Evil Dead II (1987) when Ash fights his own possessed severed hand & they also come across a blood stained hockey mask at one point. The film moves along like a rocket & each segment provides variety although some get more screen time than others. One aspect where I thought Waxwork II: Lost in Time didn't do so well with was it's uneven tone when it comes to the balance between comedy & horror, one moment it tries to be a proper horror film with scares like the Frankenstein segment is to start with but then it suddenly descends into camp comedy as Baron Frankenstein is strangled his eyes pop out of their sockets & his brain shoots out the top of his head complete with comedy sound effects. The most developed segment is the climax set in medieval times which strangely isn't based on any other film that I can think of, there is a scene in this part where a big fat executioner complete with black hood approaches a woman tied up but instead of whipping or hurting her he pulls a feather out & starts to tickle her!

Director Hickox films with some style & there are some nice moments, some of the scene transitions, some of the angles & it's a good looking film throughout. Forget about any real scares as the comedy stuff dilutes it too much for it to be wholly effective. There is some decent gore, lots of spraying blood, brains, eyes, severed hands, zombies getting their heads shot off, aliens emerging from someones mouth & a guy hanging up with his chest cut open exposing his ribcage.

Technically the film is good, some of the sets are a bit limited, it tries to remake Alien using two sets for instance. The special effects range from impressive to poor especially the rubbery looking alien & the awful Godzilla. The acting is campy which suits the material. The likes of David Carradine, Bruce Campbell, Marina Sirtis, John Ireland, Alexander Gudunov & Drew Barrymore all turn up in roles.

Waxwork II: Lost in Time is a fun, entertaining film that most horror fans will surely enjoy to some extent. I'm not sure about some of the juvenile silly comedy but nothings perfect, right? Not as good or gory as the original & doesn't contain any waxworks at all but I think it's still well worth a watch, definitely recommended.
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3/10
Waxwork II: Lost the plot
BA_Harrison9 January 2009
Writer/director Anthony Hickox attempts to repeat the success of his debut, Waxwork, with this silly sequel that once again offers him the opportunity to tackle several different sub-genres of horror. This time around, however, he gets the recipe all wrong and the result is a very messy and not particularly funny horror/comedy that makes one wonder whether the first Waxwork was something of a fluke.

Part two—Lost in Time—follows on directly from part one, with Mark (Zach Galligan) and Sarah (this time played by Monika Schnarre) escaping from the burning museum, closely followed by a zombie hand. After this crawling menace kills Sarah's step-father, the poor girl winds up in court accused of murder; her only chance of proving her innocence is to follow Mark through a series of time portals in an attempt to find evidence that will support her outlandish story.

This preposterous and poorly constructed plot serves merely as an excuse for the director to throw in as many references to his favourite movies as possible; thus, we get a lame Aliens rip-off, A silly Dawn of the Dead style zombie skit, Hickox's take on Frankenstein's monster, a Nosferatu homage (shot in flickery black and white); plus brief appearances from Jack the Ripper, Godzilla, Mr. Hyde, and many more characters that will be familiar to fans of fantasy/horror cinema.

Rather than make a serious attempt to capture the look and feel of the films he is referencing (something he did extremely well in Waxwork), Hickox instead prefers to try and emulate the splatstick comedy of Evil Dead 2—something he completely fails to do, despite even going to the trouble of casting Evil Dead star Bruce Campbell. To make matters worse, the film is way too long (104 freakin' minutes!!) and features music that sounds suspiciously like a weak copy of Goblin's score for Suspiria.
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9/10
Better than the first
bubthezombie317 September 2005
I find Waxwork 2 to be an improvement in practically every way to it's predecessor. Waxwork did lag in a few places but Waxwork 2 never lets up and I can't recall once being bored through the whole thing. Also the comedy has been notched up and I think for the better. The acting is good, the effects/production design is top notch as well and the music is even better than before, including a cheezy rap video during the end credits. Also the many homages are quite good and funny with the Dawn of the dead and Nasfaeruatu(I know that's not spelled right) being the funniest. The only real complaints I have with this one is the change in the characters(Sarah going from rich to in a crappy apartment), there was too much time spent in the medieval tale, and some of the other homages like the Dawn of the dead one should've been longer. Overall I find this to be a superior sequel that is never boring and constantly entertaining. P.S. Look out for a funny cameo by Bruce Campbell.
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6/10
Lamer than the first, which is a pity.
eddax13 January 2010
Like most sequels, Waxwork II is lamer than the first, which is a pity because I liked its predecessor.

Their director/writer Anthony Hickox pretty much took what was fun about the first - the entering into different horror realms - and ran amok with it. The leads travel through time (and I guess realities) - much like Sliders - while looking for something or other. Slowly at first, but eventually they wind up barreling through realities as though Hickox had too many references that he wanted to fit into the movie but didn't have enough time to. Some are fun - one S&M one is a tad disturbing - but they've since lost their original charm.

Horror-comedy stalwart, Bruce Campbell, does the same overacting schtick from his Evil Dead movies but his all-too-short cameo was the highlight of the movie for me.
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8/10
Excellent fun
DarthVoorhees4 September 2005
Warning: Spoilers
It's really too bad Tony Hickox had to put gore in this because it doesn't need it.I mean Waxwork II could have been a great Back to the Future type family movie with a few re-writes.The story is about two college students who jump through dimensions(based off of old stories and horror films) to prove their name in a murder case. The film is very colorful and fun.I would have liked it if the Scarbis story was cut a little shorter but I was happy with what we got.The highlight of the movie is the swordfight,the Nosferatu scene was laugh out loud funny.I rented it for B movie legend Bruce Campbell,he has a brief part but fans won't be disappointed.
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2/10
A Bitter Disappointment
jamesbourke5920 September 2012
I've often thought many years after my first initial viewing of this sequel, just what was Anthony Hickox thinking when he wrote and directed this serious misfire to what was a very enjoyable and fun filled original.

Admittedly when it came to the first Waxwork, what drew my attention to the movie was the groovy looking cover, such a weakness for cool looking artwork covers still haunts me to this very day, even though I am no longer than impressionable teenager, but a man celebrating his fortieth year on this planet(how about that for ageing this review and indeed myself) Luckily the first movie was able to deliver upon the promise of the synopsis and the artwork on show. What the second installment was sadly lacking was direction, a cohesive storyline and more importantly that fun factor.

I remember when this was first announced, I was so excited, because after Waxwork, Hickox made what was arguably(for me anyway) his best movie, Sundown The Vampire In Retreat, so having watched both these movies, I felt a need to watch any movie that Hickox applied his name to.

With the first Waxwork, the story had an aim and fully formed structure, plus a great cast to see it through, alas all the name's attached to Lost In Time, we mere time fillers and what did he have them do, re-enact/rehash classic scenes from 'The Haunting' and 'Alien' et al.

I can still hear Lesley Gore singing 'It's my party' at the end credits of the original, too bad this monster mash up, that Hickox threw together couldn't find that necessary gel to make it all stick.

A bitter disappointment. 2/10
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5/10
Waxwork II is worth-waxing, but it does have bits that they should had wax-off.
ironhorse_iv31 January 2015
Warning: Spoilers
Often cited as the first self-referential horror movie, 1988's Waxwork had everything that a horror movie fan might love: full of horror film references, over the top gorn, and amazingly accurate & professional looking sets & costumes. Considering the films low budget and campy factor, the movie was a surprising semi-successful movie when it came out. Due to this success, a sequel came out in 1992, call Waxwork 2: Lost in Time. It follows nearly that same escapism formula, but unlike the first film, it didn't take itself, too serious as it play off with the comedy, a lot more. Directed and written by Anthony Hickox, yet again, Waxwork 2 takes place immediately after the first film, Waxworks, with a recap and replay of the last moments of the film with reused footage. Then the movie kinda starts with an reenactment of final scenes with Mark Loftmore (Zack Galligan) and Sarah Brightman (Monika Schnarre) leaving the burning waxwork. Seeking revenge for the fire that cause the destruction to the Waxwork, a disembodied wax hand goes on a murderous rage and kills Sarah's father. Mark and Sarah manage to kill the creature, but the police don't believe them and accuse Sarah for killer her abusive father. Since, Sarah's case looks bad, both seek a way to prove her innocence by searching Sir Wilfred's (Patrick Macnee) place. Instead, of having the couple find another waxwork building, the movie goes a different route, by having the two characters find a magic compass that allows them to travel through another dimension call 'Cartagra' consisting of horror, sci-fi and fantasy stories that have want to become realities. Most of these sequences are pretty clever on how they were able to paid homage to the many horror films without breaking copy-rights laws. The crew of the Waxwork 2 change some of the other film references character's names, location or in many ways, redesigning the look of the creatures to make sure, it looks different, but has the same style as the original film. They all get a new treatment, but you can tell what film references, the movie is showing. Examples are 1931's Frankenstein, 1963's The Haunting, 1922's Nosferatu, 1941's Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde, 1954's Godzilla, 1979's Alien and 1978's Dawn of the Dead. According to the movie exposition, these worlds comprise worlds where God and the devil battle over the fate of the world, each victory being reflected in events occurring in the real world. When Mark or Sarah appear in each reality, they take on the persona of characters in those stories. They often act like their character personalities and memories until they regain their senses. It's weird that plot, only makes one person forget, who they are; while the other, never forgets. Mark always knows that he's Mark when he enter the world, but Sarah always get lost in the sequence character roles. I know, that Sarah does this in the first movie, but gees… its way over killed, here. Mark had to wake her up, like 3 to 4 times, before she rejoin her conscious and her original memories. It's so annoying! Sarah is still the same stupid damsel in distress character with the emo attitude that makes her easily fall in love, with her abusers like the first movie. This movie made me, hate her character, even more, due to the new actress, playing her. Monika Schnarre is worse than the original actress, Deborah Foreman. She looks out of place, most of the time, due to her stunning model like looks, and awkward European accent. Zack Galligan as Mark is a little better than the previous film. I glad, they cut the jerk attitude of his, and made him into a more adventure driven type of a stock character. The supporting characters are pretty fun to have. David Carradine appears out of nowhere and gives absolutely straight and deadly serious, performance. He's a great actor. He brings a lot of weight to the character that he would have lacked otherwise. Alexander Godunov as Scarabus was very scary, and insidious. Well played. Bruce Campbell as John Loftmore had the comedy cuts and gave the movie, some charm by hamming it up. The movie is full of cheesy dialogue and he deliver on it. The movie comedy is a hit or a miss. It breaks a lot of four wall jokes, but none of it, seem that clever. Watching this movie with a group of friends is a real treat, and it was fun to just try and pick out all the references like 1981's Raiders of Lost Ark, 1977's Saturday Night Fever, 1982's Friday the 13th Part III, 1968's 2001: Space Odyssey, 1989's Back to the Future Part 2, and others. I love the action. The swordfight through multi-worlds was fun. As a movie of logic, it really fails in that. First off, why would Sarah's trial allow her to go anywhere, if she's a suspected for a death? I doubt, she was able to get bait. Another thing, why on earth, do they need to find evidence so that they can prove that she didn't do it; if she just going to escape and follow Mark into exploring the Cartagra, in the end. It's pretty pointless. The call for adventure is a pretty weak plot. Another thing, how can she get a package from Mark with the compass, if Cartagra isn't part of the real world!?! It's doesn't make sense. To make it more confusing, Jack the Ripper, a real life killer is in Cartagara. Just think of that. It's yet another Waxwork movie that can't follow its own rules. I know its nit-picky, but it's too jarring even for this silly film. I like how the movie doesn't match the title. There are barely any Wax works figures in this movie, at all. Overall: While the plot is pretty bad. It's a fun movie. Just turn off your brain when watching.
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7/10
Fun Horror
psnider-888-60332825 March 2014
This movie is about a man and woman who end up fighting evil (with other forces of good) in a strange realm. It is like a mirror world and while fighting against evil in a general way they are also looking to find a way to prove that the woman is not guilty of a murder she is being accused of. There are Frankenstein and Alien stories they enter but the highlight is definitely the haunted house story with the always reliable and hilarious Bruce Campbell. They end up in a medieval story where a lunatic is trying to seize power and his plan is pretty weird to say the least. This story is easily the longest of the bunch but it looks really cool and the villain is great and they go to several different and strange worlds. This is a really fun horror-comedy-B-movie if you like this genre!
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6/10
Take it for what it is.
insomniac_rod1 September 2007
Warning: Spoilers
"Waxwork II : Lost In Time" is a kickass-entertaining Horror flick with black comedy overtones and plenty of action.

The ending is among the best I've seen on the cheesy-splatter section. The f/x are not that bad but could've been better. Some monsters looked very cheesy but still worked for the movie's purpose. I dig this movie because it does not tries to impress anyone; I mean, it's purpose is only to entertain and spill plenty of blood to satisfy gorehounds.

Bruce Campbell and the gorgeous super sexy Monica Schnarre (from "Boogie's Diner" fame) deliver fine performances.

This movie is a hoot! Watch it with low expectations and you might be impressed. Also, the end credits song is tongue in cheek.
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7/10
The book is upside down.....
FlashCallahan1 January 2013
Warning: Spoilers
The survivors of the wax museum are followed by a dismembered hand, which kills the girl's father.

She must stand trial, so her and her boyfriend go to Sir Wilfred's house for clues, and they find a film he has prepared for them, pointing the way to his secret stash.

They find a dimension hopping, time machine compass and go back in time to look for evidence that the girl is telling the truth and get embroiled in different conflicts along the way....

The first movie didn't really get going until the inspired last ten minutes (where Whedon stole the idea for his finale in Cabin In The Woods), and this remedies the fact by making it really bonkers and amusing from the upstart.

it's like an adult version of Stay Tuned, and each little episode really makes the film a little more exciting than it should be.

The sections with Bruce Campbell and Martin Kemp are easily the best, it's just a shame that the finale with Godunov is pretty bland apart from him and the guy from Power Station who likes white make up.

if they swapped this and had the Frankenstein scene as the finale, this could have been a a classic movie, but the last twenty minutes just seems like a vanity project for the director who plays the predominant Kings Guard and is in almost every other shot come the end.

Thankfully though, the film has enough great cameos and funny moments, to justify the maundering nature of the medieval scene.

a great campy cult classic, with a saggy vanity project finale.
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