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10 Alien Facts You Never Knew

10 Alien Facts You Never Knew
"In Space, No One Can Hear You Scream." Long before Prometheus, Predators, and even poor Newt, Ridley Scott's Alien blew open the space doors for sci-fi horror. Here we'll take a look at 10 Things You Never Knew About Alien.

The Dune connection.

The story behind experimental filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky's cancelled adaptation of Dune is the stuff of movie legend, lovingly detailed in the 2013 documentary, Jodorowsky's Dune. Dan O'Bannon, who co-wrote the 1974 sci-fi comedy Dark Star with John Carpenter, was hired to supervise the special effects for Dune, where he also worked with Swiss artist H.R. Giger. When Dune collapsed, O'Bannon found himself sleeping on the couch of another writer, Ronald Shusett. O'Bannon would eventually reassemble much of the artistic team from Dune for Alien, including Giger, Ron Cobb, Chris Foss, and legendary French artist Moebius.

Star Beast.

O'Bannon showed Shusett a script he'd started back in 1972 but had never finished.

10 Alien Facts You Never Knew

10 Alien Facts You Never Knew
"In Space, No One Can Hear You Scream." Long before Prometheus, Predators, and even poor Newt, Ridley Scott's Alien blew open the space doors for sci-fi horror. Here we'll take a look at 10 Things You Never Knew About Alien.

The Dune connection.

The story behind experimental filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky's cancelled adaptation of Dune is the stuff of movie legend, lovingly detailed in the 2013 documentary, Jodorowsky's Dune. Dan O'Bannon, who co-wrote the 1974 sci-fi comedy Dark Star with John Carpenter, was hired to supervise the special effects for Dune, where he also worked with Swiss artist H.R. Giger. When Dune collapsed, O'Bannon found himself sleeping on the couch of another writer, Ronald Shusett. O'Bannon would eventually reassemble much of the artistic team from Dune for Alien, including Giger, Ron Cobb, Chris Foss, and legendary French artist Moebius.

Star Beast.

O'Bannon showed Shusett a script he'd started back in 1972 but had never finished.
See full article at MovieWeb »

Check out these early Xenomorph concepts for Ridley Scott’s Alien

The original Xenomorph in Ridley Scott’s Alien remains one of the most iconic monsters in movie history. Coming from the twisted mind of Swiss artist H.R. Giger, the Xenomorph was at once terrifying, and eerily familiar. However, what if the Xenomorph looked a bit… different. What if it was less H.R. Giger, and more David Cronenberg? What if it just looked plain ridiculous? Producer Walter Hill was recently on an episode of the podcast Wtf with Marc Maron, and he talks about then-Alien director Robert Aldrich’s original pitch for the look of the now-infamous Xenomorph:

“[Aldrich] said the movie will succeed or fail on the conception of the beast. He said, ‘we’ve gotta come up with something really unique.’ And he said, ‘I don’t know, just off the top of my head…. this may not be a good idea but… maybe we could get, like, an orangutan…
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

‘Alien’ Evolution: Explore Every Stage in the Xenomorph’s Gruesome Life Cycle

‘Alien’ Evolution: Explore Every Stage in the Xenomorph’s Gruesome Life Cycle
Alien” and its many sequels and prequels have always been about transformation. The creature itself is constantly changing, as are those unfortunate enough to encounter it. As you celebrate Alien Day — celebrated on April 26 because the original film is set on the planet Lv-426 — take a moment to revisit the many forms Sigourney Weaver’s greatest screen partner has taken on in the nearly 40 years since H.R. Giger and Ridley Scott first introduced us to it.

The facehugger (“Alien”)

Our first exposure to the otherworldly creature known among fans as the xenomorph remains the most quietly unsettling. “It’s got a wonderful defense mechanism,” Parker (Yaphet Kotto) says after noticing the facehugger’s acidic blood: “You don’t dare kill it.”

Almost reminiscent of a scorpion in its appearance, the facehugger was initially intended by Giger to be larger and possess eyes; screenwriter Dan O’Bannon had imagined it as an octopus-like being with tentacles.
See full article at Indiewire »

Ditched Indiana Jones ideas that might appear in Indy 5

Stuart Wilson Oct 12, 2016

Lots of ideas for the Indiana Jones films to date haven't yet made it to the screen - so could Indiana Jones 5 use them?

As the July 2019 release date inches closer, we still have no idea what will feature in the fifth Indiana Jones movie, that was confirmed earlier this year. If the earlier sequels are anything to go by though, there's a good chance we'll see some discarded concepts from previously ditched drafts.

You might think this kind of cobbling together of earlier ideas is what led to the rather messy Indiana Jones And The Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull. However, as of Indiana Jones And The Temple Of Doom, we were seeing scenes that Lucas and Spielberg hadn't been able to fit into Raiders Of The Lost Ark. The stopover in Shanghai was originally considered during the Raiders story conferences, as was the climactic mine cart ride.
See full article at Den of Geek »

'It was amazing to watch Lance be cut in half' ... behind the scenes on James Cameron's Aliens - in pictures

The making of James Cameron’s 1986 space horror, as revealed in a book Aliens: The Set Photography. The book, which includes brand new set photos and commentary from cast member Carrie Henn (who played Newt), details how Cameron and his set designer Ron Cobb created the world in which Ripley and co are stalked by predatory aliens, lead by a territorial queen

Continue reading...
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Cool Custom Lego Xenomorph From Alien

This Lego xenomorph was inspired by Ridley Scott’s classic film Alien. It was created by the Arvo Brothers, and they’ve released a project design book that gives you a step-by-step guide on how to build your own.

Inspired by the works of geniuses H.R. Giger and Ron Cobb, this new project presented us with an opportunity to build one of the greatest icons of fantasy art. A journey from organic to geometric shapes, from dark to light, and the deep admiration that drives us to build all our creations as our only luggage. This book includes detailed, step-to-step instructions showing how to build the model, together with comments, pictures and diagrams that help the description and will contribute to your understanding of the entire process.

I love this design and that they even managed to include xenomorph drool. To get the instructions on how to build this bad boy,
See full article at GeekTyrant »

What debt does Alien owe David Cronenberg’s Shivers?

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Alien may be a sci-fi horror classic, but what about the movies that inspired it - including David Cronenberg’s debut, Shivers?

At first, they might look as different as night and day. One is the directorial debut from a maverick Canadian director, the other is a Hollywood movie funded by 20th Century Fox. One is set in deep space, the other in a luxury apartment block on terra firma. One had a decent amount of money to throw at the construction of sets and special effects, the other was made for a few thousand dollars.

Yet Alien, released in 1979 and triggering a franchise that is still growing and mutating today, has more in common with Shivers than at first meets the eye. Cronenberg made Shivers for approximately $130,000 in 1975. Could it be that this low-budget shocker inspired what is still considered to be the ultimate space horror movie?
See full article at Den of Geek »

15 of sci-fi cinema's most eccentric spaceships

An alien craft shaped like an artichoke? A vessel with breasts? Here's our pick of 15 of sci-fi cinema's most eccentric spaceships...

For decades, heroes have crossed the universe in rocket ships and modified light freighters. Aliens have conquered galaxies in disc-shaped craft of varying sizes.

Yes, as long as there's been science fiction on the silver screen, spaceships have captured our imagination, from the matinee serials of the 30s to the sci-fi blockbusters of the present.

We all have our own idea of what a great spaceship should look like. For some, it's Han Solo's fastest hunk of junk in the galaxy, the Millennium Falcon. For others, it's the more graceful USS Enterprise, or maybe the utilitarian craft of 2001: A Space Odyssey. But what about cinema's more unusual, outlandish spaceships? The ramshackle ones, the anachronistic ones, the ones that look a bit rude, or just plain scary? Those are
See full article at Den of Geek »

36 major blockbusters and why they never got made

We look at the films that slipped through Hollywood's net, from biblical epics to a time travelling Gladiator sequel...

This article contains a spoiler for Gladiator.

If you're one of those frustrated over the quality of many of the blockbusters that make it to the inside of a multiplex, then ponder the following. For each of these were supposed to be major projects, that for one reason or another, stalled on their way to the big screen. Some still may make it. But for many others, the journey is over. Here are the big blockbusters that never were...

1. Airframe

The late Michael Crichton scored another residential on the bestseller list with his impressive thriller, Airframe. It was published in 1996, just after films of Crichton works such as Jurassic Park, Rising Sun, Disclosure and the immortal Congo had proven to be hits of various sizes.

So: a hit book, another techno thriller,
See full article at Den of Geek »

Watch: 9-Minute Video Essay Explores The Grisly Chestburster Scene From 'Alien'

We’ve all been there. You eat and eat and eat, and your stomach gets so full, you feel as if you’re about to burst. Well, if you were Kane (played by John Hurt) in Ridley Scott’s “Alien,” then burst it did. Though, not exactly due to too much food. The “chestburster” scene from the 1979 film is one of cinema’s all time classics, and CineFix breaks down the mechanics and history behind it in this amazing new “Art of the Scene.” The nine-minute video starts with an introduction of the key players behind the “Alien” aesthetic, namely Scott, writers Dan O’Bannon and Ronald Shusett, and designers Ron Cobb, Chris Foss, and H.R. Giger. Cobb, a former engineer, was largely responsible for the look of the Nostromo, the crew’s ship in the film. The dining room he helped bring about gave a sense of normalcy to the deep-space setting,
See full article at The Playlist »

Daily Dead’s 2014 Holiday Gift Guide: Day One

  • DailyDead
Happy Black Friday everyone! With the holiday shopping season kicking off today, we thought we’d get a jump start on our Annual Holiday Gift Guide as well, so that we can provide you guys with some great gift options and help you save a few bucks in the process.

Once again, Daily Dead is going to be posting some of our favorite gift ideas for all the horror, sci-fi and comics lovers out there over the next few weeks and just because we want to do something fun for our readers, at the end of each day’s recap, we’ll be posting a holiday horror-related trivia question and giving away great prize pack featuring items from our fantastic sponsors, including Scream Factory, Anchor Bay Entertainment and Horror Decor.

Vendor Spotlight: HorrorDecor.net

For any horror fan out there who likes to incorporate their love of zombies, slasher movies
See full article at DailyDead »

Double Review: Deadly Eyes & Leviathan (Blu-ray)

  • DailyDead
Scream Factory recently gifted us genre fans a double dose of creature feature terrors with their Blu-ray releases of the killer rat flick Deadly Eyes and George P. Cosmatos’ hugely underrated deep sea horror film Leviathan. While both films aren’t necessarily well-known amongst more casual fans, it’s great to see Scream put such great effort into their presentations for each of these cult classics.

For those who haven’t seen it before, Deadly Eyes (or Rats)is a rather ridiculous (but wonderfully so) early ‘80s nature-run-amok story that plays up the concerns and dangers of modern urban society by way of roided-out killer rat infestations that have a penchant for human flesh. The film takes its premise very seriously, but it’s the use of Daschunds in rat costumes that has given Deadly Eyes something of an unintentional comedic spin, making for a rather uneven horror film.

But
See full article at DailyDead »

How Steven Spielberg's Night Skies Became E.T.

Ryan Lambie Jun 12, 2019

Intended as a sequel to Close Encounters, Night Skies began in the 1970s and eventually became E.T.

Having scored a phenomenal hit with Jaws in 1975, director Steven Spielberg used his considerable industry clout to make Close Encounters Of The Third Kind - a science fiction fairytale for the UFO age. It was a personal project for Spielberg, conceived and partly written by the director himself (several other writers made uncredited passes on the script), and based on Firelight, the UFO film he'd shot for $500 while he was a teenager.

“I had a real, deep-rooted belief that we had been visited in this century,” the director once said of his fascination with the UFO phenomenon. “I was a real UFO devotee in the 1970s, and really into the UFO phenomenon from reading. For me, it was science.”

Like Jaws, the production on Close Encounters was difficult; as
See full article at Den of Geek »

How Steven Spielberg's Night Skies became E.T.

Intended as a sequel to Close Encounters, Night Skies began in the 1970s but later stalled. We look at how its ideas evolved into E.T...

Feature

Having scored a phenomenal hit with Jaws in 1975, director Steven Spielberg used his considerable industry clout to make Close Encounters Of The Third Kind - a science fiction fairytale for the UFO age. It was a personal project for Spielberg, conceived and partly written by the director himself (several other writers made uncredited passes on the script), and based on Firelight, the UFO film he'd shot for $500 while he was a teenager.

“I had a real, deep-rooted belief that we had been visited in this century,” the director once said of his fascination with the UFO phenomenon. “I was a real UFO devotee in the 1970s, and really into the UFO phenomenon from reading. For me, it was science.”

Like Jaws, the production
See full article at Den of Geek »

Horror History: When Steven Spielberg's E.T. Was Evil in Night Skies

Here's a little known fact for you guys... After the success of Close Encounters of the Third Kind, director Steven Spielberg had something a lot darker in mind for us. Read on for details and a look at what E.T. was originally supposed to be.

Spielberg was fascinated by an event which transpired back in August 21, 1955, which became known as The Kelly, Kentucky Alien Invasion.

On that evening Billy Ray Taylor and his wife were visiting the Sutton farm. Billy exited the house to go fetch water from the Sutton family well and while doing so saw what he described as an "immense, shining object" landing about a quarter of a mile from the house. It wasn't long before he and the Sutton family were besieged by extraterrestrial invaders who were trying to break into the Sutton home. Click the link above for more on that story.

After becoming aware of the Kentucky incident,
See full article at Dread Central »

Hr Giger and the making of Alien

Ryan Lambie Apr 26, 2017

To celebrate Alien Day, we pay tribute to the work of the late artist Hr Giger, and follow the making of his masterpiece of design...

It’s the summer of 1978, and the UK’s Shepperton Studios simmers in the heat. Secreted away in his own personal workshop, a Swiss artist works feverishly on his paintings and sculptures, either fashioning strange shapes from gigantic blocks of styrofoam or spraying them with his airbrush.

See related 50 upcoming comic book TV shows, and when to expect them

This is 38-year-old Hr Giger, and he cuts an unusual figure. His shock of black hair is slicked back away from his pale forehead. He refuses to take his leather jacket off despite the searing heat. On a bench sits row after row of human and animal bones - skulls, femurs, vertebrae - plus a weird assortment of ribbed hoses, wires and mechanical
See full article at Den of Geek »

Hr Giger and the making of Alien

We pay tribute to the work of the late artist Hr Giger, and follow the making of his masterpiece of design, the Alien...

Feature

It’s the summer of 1978, and the UK’s Shepperton Studios simmers in the heat. Secreted away in his own personal workshop, a Swiss artist works feverishly on his paintings and sculptures, either fashioning strange shapes from gigantic blocks of styrofoam or spraying them with his airbrush.

This is 38-year-old Hr Giger, and he cuts an unusual figure. His shock of black hair is slicked back away from his pale forehead. He refuses to take his leather jacket off despite the searing heat. On a bench sits row after row of human and animal bones - skulls, femurs, vertebrae - plus a weird assortment of ribbed hoses, wires and mechanical parts taken from old Rolls Royce motorcars. Quietly, obsessively, Giger is building his Alien.

The story
See full article at Den of Geek »

Alien: Isolation – preview

Creative Assembly has announced a survival horror successor to Alien, Ridley Scott's brooding sci-fi classic

The cleaners have started to come round the Creative Assembly offices. I walk into a stark white bathroom where a paper towel dispenser's guts hang open below the hand dryer. It looks sad. I walk towards a cubicle.

Suddenly, the hand dryer goes off by itself and my chest clutches in at me like a claw. The hand dryer switches itself on and off and on and off. Each time I remind myself there's no one there.

The cleaner pops in. 'Sorry!' she says, and potters off.

Even as I write this I still feel frightened. There's a kind of bleak dread I felt on the Sevastopol, the remote space station featured in Alien: Isolation. It's a dread that lingers. The game's environment is beautiful, enchanting even. But it is unsettling. And the…
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Mike Gold: Newspapers’ Slow and Painful Death

It seems like every day I read about another editorial cartoonist losing his job, and that’s a real shame.

Editorial cartoons are one-panel comics that told an entire story that commented on the news of the day. It wasn’t long ago that this stuff was run on the front page of many, if not most, great American newspapers. Everybody had one on staff – except the Metropolis Daily Planet, which, oddly, didn’t seem to hire many cartoonists. Most newspapers also deployed syndicated editorial cartoons as well. Many weekly newsmagazines reprinted them, and The Week still does.

There were brilliant editorial cartoonists. And by “brilliant,” I mean text-book phenomenal. My favorite was Bill Mauldin; other greats include Ron Cobb, Paul

Conrad, John Fischetti, Herblock, Thomas Nast, Carey Orr, John T. McCutcheon (there’s a rest stop on the Indiana Toll Way named after him) and Theodor Geisel. Yep, that’s Doctor Suess.
See full article at Comicmix »
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