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Morven Christie: 'Am I the go-to actress to play a bitch?'

The star of BBC1’s new cuckoo-in-the-nest thriller The Replacement on how she went from being a kid on a council estate to roles in some of TV’s finest dramas – and why her years in the theatre were so painful

Morven Christie is quietly becoming the go-to actor for top notch British TV. She’s Amanda in ITV’s retro detective drama Grantchester, Fi Healey in Twenty Twelve, starred in award-magnet BBC dramas Murder (directed by The Killing’s Birger Larsen) last year and is Alison in The A Word, Peter Bowker’s acclaimed miniseries about autism. Alison is a tough woman who makes complicated decisions about the care of her son, and she isn’t a particularly fluffy character. So when Christie first heard about The Replacement, BBC1’s new cuckoo-in-the-nest thriller, written and directed by Joe Ahearne, she started to wonder if she was being typecast. “I thought,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Murder – The Third Voice review: a complex jigsaw of truth, guilt and grief

Danish director Birger Larsen delivers a beautifully crafted and satisfyingly confusing quadruple murder mystery. Plus: Mary Beard gets hi-tech in Pompeii

You have to feel for Birger Larsen, the Danish director of Murder: The Third Voice (BBC2). You’d think, in the Borders, he’d be pretty much guaranteed some miserable weather – a big helping of Celtic noir from above. But today, if not quite sunny, Tweeddale looks quite friendly – there’s even birdsong! Mournful music helps create a mood of stark gloom. And then the body, of a big, bearlike man, pulled by police out of a river.

He didn’t drown, says a woman who seems to be the investigating officer; he died from a stab wound near his left armpit. This must be the murder of the title, although we don’t know who he is yet. And, in the end, his will turn out to be
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Aalbæk Jensen plots 'Angelic Avengers' adaptation

  • ScreenDaily
Danish producer and Zentropa co-founder Peter Aalbæk Jensen is plotting a new English-language feature based on a novel by revered Out Of Africa author Karen Blixen.

The Angelic Avengers, published in 1946 under the pen name Isak Dinesen, is billed as “a Gothic romance”.

The film will be directed by Birger Larsen, who directed several episodes of Scandinavian TV noir The Killing as well as British TV movie Murder: Joint Enterprise.

The Angelic Avengers is the story of two young women abandoned and trying to cope with poverty and grief in 19th century Britain and France. An elderly Scottish cleric and his wife invite the girls to live on their estate in France, apparently kindly intentions.. But the girls discover that, under cover of piety and idealism, the clergyman and his wife lure young girls into their grasp into to sell them into the white slave trade.

Jensen is looking for British partners for the project, which is likely
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Greatest TV Pilots: Forbrydelsen and The Killing

Forbrydelsen, Season 1: Episode 1 – “Episode 1″

Written by Per Daumiller, Torleif Hoppe, Michael W. Horsten & Soren Sveistrup

Directed by Birger Larsen

Aired on January 7th, 2007 on DR1

The Killing, Season 1: Episode 1 – “Pilot”

Written by Veena Sud

Directed by Patty Jenkins

Aired on April 3rd, 2011 on AMC

While most current television viewers will probably have at least heard of AMC’s The Killing (which has been cancelled twice only to be renewed twice and will have a final, shortened season on Netflix), few Americans will have encountered Forbrydelsen, the Danish series The Killing is based on. And though the commonly held opinion of The Killing is that it turned into an elongated train wreck of a story for its first two seasons, there’s an almost unanimous respect for its exciting and well-executed pilot. The Killing‘s pilot certainly owes a lot to its Danish predecessor–and if you watch both back-to-back,
See full article at SoundOnSight »

'Peril' wins BAFTA Scotland awards

  • ScreenDaily
For Those in Peril and Screen Star of Tomorrow George Mackay picked up top awards.Scroll down for full list of winners

Paul Wright’s For Those In Peril, about a young man in a Scottish fishing village reeling after a tragic accident, did the double at the BAFTA Scotland Awards 2013 last night.

At a ceremony in Glasgow, honouring both Scottish productions as well as Scottish talent working in other UK productions, lead actor George Mackay picked up the coveted best actor/actress in film award.

The film, which was selected for Cannes Critics’ Week, also won best film beating competition from documentary Fire in the Night and ganger feature The Wee Man.

However, both runners-up picked up separate awards with Fire In the Night winning best single documentary and The Wee Man picking up the BAFTA Scotland Cineworld Audience Award, voted for by the public.

Emma Davie and Morag Mckinnon both collected the best director award for
See full article at ScreenDaily »

'Peril' wins at BAFTA Scotland awards

  • ScreenDaily
For Those in Peril and Screen Star of Tomorrow George Mackay picked up top awards.Scroll down for full list of winners

Paul Wright’s For Those In Peril, about a young man in a Scottish fishing village reeling after a tragic accident, did the double at the BAFTA Scotland Awards 2013 last night.

At a ceremony in Glasgow, honouring both Scottish productions as well as Scottish talent working in other UK productions, lead actor George Mackay picked up the coveted best actor/actress in film award.

The film, which was selected for Cannes Critics’ Week, also won best film beating competition from documentary Fire in the Night and ganger feature The Wee Man.

However, both runners-up picked up separate awards with Fire In the Night winning best single documentary and The Wee Man picking up the BAFTA Scotland Cineworld Audience Award, voted for by the public.

Emma Davie and Morag Mckinnon both collected the best director award for
See full article at ScreenDaily »

BAFTA TV Craft Awards 2013: The winners and nominees in full

Digital Spy presents a list of winners and nominees at the BAFTA TV Craft Awards 2013, hosted by Stephen Mangan from The Brewery in London on Sunday, April 28, 2013:

Breakthrough Talent

Mike Bartlett - The Town

Julie Gearey - Prisoners' Wives

Rhys Thomas - Freddie Mercury: The Great Pretender (Director's Cut)

Tim Whitnall - Best Possible Taste: The Kenny Everett Story - Winner

Costume Design

Amy Roberts - Mrs Biggs

Sheena Napier - Parade's End - Winner

Odile Dicks-Mireaux - Richard II (The Hollow Crown)

Lorna Marie Mugan - Ripper Street

Digital Creativity

Steve Boulton, James Rutherford - Channel 4 Paralympics - Winner

Production Team - Embarrassing Bodies: Live from the Clinic

Production Team - Foxes Live: Wild in the City

Production Team - The Great British Property Scandal

Director (Factual)

Katharine English - Our War

Ben Chanan - The Plot to Bring Down Britain's Planes - Winner

John Dower
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

House of Cards meets Borgen, literally

As House of Cards creator Michael Dobbs plans to work with Danish TV writer Adam Price on a new political drama, we applaud the collaboration

The breeding of racehorses aims to bring together two genetically complimentary thoroughbreds in the hope of creating an even stronger winner: for example, Saturday's Grand National winner, Auroras Empire, was bred in Ireland by combining the dam Sama Veda and the sire Second Empire. So it's fitting that, shortly after TV's biggest race, television announced its own attempt at breeding a new winner from two frontrunners.

A planned political drama, hoped to be seen by 2014, will, in stud-farm parlance, be "by" House of Cards "out of" Borgen. Or, possibly, the other way round. Because while, in the case of horses, it is pretty clear which of the partners should be on top, the announced collaboration between Michael Dobbs, creator of the British parliamentary thriller, and Adam Price,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

BAFTA TV Craft Awards 2013: The nominations in full

Digital Spy presents a list of nominees for the BAFTA TV Craft Awards 2013, to be hosted by Stephen Mangan from The Brewery in London on Sunday, April 28, 2012:

Breakthrough Talent

Mike Bartlett - The Town

Julie Gearey - Prisoners' Wives

Rhys Thomas - Freddie Mercury: The Great Pretender (Director's Cut)

Tim Whitnall - Best Possible Taste: The Kenny Everett Story

Costume Design

Amy Roberts - Mrs Biggs

Sheena Napier - Parade's End

Odile Dicks-Mireaux - Richard II (The Hollow Crown)

Lorna Marie Mugan - Ripper Street

Digital Creativity

Steve Boulton, James Rutherford - Channel 4 Paralympics

Production Team - Embarrassing Bodies: Live from the Clinic

Production Team - Foxes Live: Wild in the City

Production Team - The Great British Property Scandal

Director (Factual)

Katharine English - Our War

Ben Chanan - The Plot to Bring Down Britain's Planes

John Dower - Bradley Wiggins: A Year in Yellow

Ben Anthony
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Rewind TV: Doctor Who; Citizen Khan; Murder: Joint Enterprise; Bad Sugar – review

There was more wit in five minutes of Doctor Who than the whole of Citizen Khan, and the sci-fi serial pulled off another extraordinary trick – making the Daleks scary again

Dr Who (BBC1) | iPlayer

Citizen Khan (BBC1) | iPlayer

Murder: Joint Enterprise (BBC2) | iPlayer

Bad Sugar (C4) | 4Od

It's remarkably seldom that a pocket cartoon can change any aspect of your life. But many years ago a man called Peter Birkett drew, for Punch, a simple cartoon featuring two Daleks confronted with a staircase. The caption was simple. "Well, this certainly buggers our plan to conquer the universe."

From that moment I was not only unafraid of Daleks but found them actively absurd. As all good gags do, this one took a while to filter into the wider world, but within a couple of years it was the wisecrack of choice in those sophisticated circles wherein Daleks were deemed worthy
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV review: Bad Sugar; A Touch Of Cloth; C4's 30 Greatest Comedy Shows; Murder: Joint Enterprise

The comedy jamboree all went on a bit – despite the three funny women in Bad Sugar

There was something of a clubby feel to television comedy this weekend. Peep Show creators Sam Bain and Jesse Armstrong, Peep Show star Olivia Colman, Fonejacker Kayvan Novak and Green Wing's Julian Rhind-Tutt all take part or appear in a preposterous Channel 4 Top 30 countdown backslapathon, narrated by Pulling's Sharon Horgan. Horgan also appears – alongside Colman, Julia Davis (who isn't in the Top 30 show but who starts her own show, Hunderby, on Monday) and Novak – in Bain and Armstrong's new take on a telly melodrama. Rhind-Tutt, meanwhile, is in Charlie Brooker's spoof cop show, over on Sky.

I'm a big fan of all of the above. But is there a hint that what was out there, alone, has stepped back from the edge, is now safely behind the yellow line (I'm thinking of the London underground,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'Killing'-style TV drama threatens to open up Nottingham's old wounds

Birger Larsen's new crime thriller, Murder, is set to dredge up dark past of the city once dubbed Shottingham

Stand on Blue Bell Hill, a grassy mound high above Nottingham, and it is easy to understand the city's appeal to television dramatists.

All human life lies below. In the distance squats the city centre, framed by ugly 1960s office blocks and concrete car parks, its skyline dominated by the Gothic spires of imposing redbrick Victorian buildings. Here, Get Carter meets Harry Potter. This cityscape will become familiar to television viewers tonight in a BBC2 crime drama, Murder, which was filmed in parts of Nottingham. Directed by Birger Larsen, the man behind the acclaimed Danish drama The Killing, Murder is promising to bring Scandinavian noir to the east Midlands.

It is not difficult to imagine Nottinghamshire's answer to detective Sarah Lund feeling at home in the city. At night Nottingham's
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Joe Dempsie: 'There's been a parting of the ways between actors and celebrities'

After a scene-stealing role in Skins, and now starring in Game of Thrones and BBC2 drama Murder, Joe Dempsie should be happy, but fame has got him all stirred up

I get the impression that a lot of the actors I admire are bonkers. So I think to myself, so I have to be a bit like that to be a good actor? A bit method, a bit weird? But the point of being an actor is to put yourself in someone else's shoes, not to have a troubled existence. It may be that the best art is caused by tortured souls but, I, er, don't want to be tortured. I saw a Q&A with Paddy Considine when he was asked about getting into his role during the shoot for Dead Man's Shoes. He said, 'If I'd have walked around with an axe in my hand at lunchtime I'd have felt like a twat.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Murder in the first person

Having characters from a trial tell their side of the story, directly to the audience, was the toughest script I've ever had to write

Murder is the toughest script I've ever written – and the most satisfying. It tells the story of the protagonists in a murder trial – the accused and those involved with the justice system – with each speaking directly to the audience, setting out their side of events. Viewers are left to make up their own minds about what really happened.

The idea of telling a story through a cast of characters addressing the camera individually seemed powerful and invigorating. But I had no idea how it might work in practice. Would it translate to page and screen?

Producer Kath Mattock and I went on research trips to murder cases at the Old Bailey, keen to see stories unfold first hand. Court officials frown on those who peer into
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

TV review: The Dark: Nature's Nighttime World; Wallander

The Dark sheds light on the scary world of stalking pumas and vampire bats

If the bright lights and fireworks of the closing ceremony weren't for you, then you can't get much further away from it than the mountains of Patagonia at night, which is where The Dark: Nature's Nighttime World (BBC2, Sunday) ends up. They're looking for pumas – the mountain lions, not Usain Bolt's running shoes. And it shouldn't be hard; this place has one of the highest puma densities of anywhere in the world – it's like puma Manhattan. Well, not really, it's still like one cat per area of mountain wilderness approximately the size of Wales, but if they're going to film one hunting at night, this is the place to do it.

Plus they've got a helicopter. Cool. Maybe it's going to be like one of those Police Camera Action programmes, where they go up
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Murder

Misfits newcomer Karla Crome stars alongside Skins actor Joe Dempsie in Murder a new drama coming to BBC 2 co-created by Robert Jones and Kath Mattock, the writer/producer team behind the BAFTA-winning series Buried.

Sisters Coleen (Karla Crome) and Erin (Lara Rossi) have an intense and volatile relationship. All they have is each other. They meet Stefan (Joe Dempsie) who is passing through town, hours later one of them is dead. All we have to go on is what the two survivors tell us. Who did it? And why?

Murder will tell the fictional story of the brutal killing of Erin, a young woman found dead one night inside the flat she shares with her sister Colleen, played by rising British star Karla Crome. The chief suspect is quickly identified as a young war veteran, Stefan, who had come back to the flat to drink and play a game of
See full article at ScreenTerrier »

'Killing' director Birger Larsen for new Nottingham-shot BBC drama

'Killing' director Birger Larsen for new Nottingham-shot BBC drama
The Killing director Birger Larsen has opened up about his new BBC show. Murder was shot in Nottingham through a red filter, a move which Larsen said was made as it is "the colour of blood". He added to The Guardian: "I don't know Nottingham, so it was a huge surprise to me when I went there for the exterior filming we did. I sensed this hostile vibe. It might just have been me, but there was this mean vibe in the streets. "I don't know why. They have got two universities there, so I was quite surprised because sometimes having a lot of youth around softens things in a city." The drama, which (more)
See full article at Digital Spy - Movie News »

Nordic noir comes to Nottingham with a new take on British crime thrillers

Birger Larsen, who directed The Killing, uses a searing red filter to bring the colour of blood to his tale of murder

The man who invented the slow, unsettling style of hit Nordic television thrillers, such as Wallander, The Killing and The Bridge, is bringing his unflinching brand of screen magic to the city of Nottingham.

There will be no cold, grey vistas, anoraks or patterned jumpers, but Danish director Birger Larsen's drama, Murder, to be broadcast on BBC2 next month, is set to show the East Midlands in a new, harsh light. Tourism to Denmark and Sweden has been boosted by the popularity of writers Henning Mankell and Jo Nesbø and television shows such as The Killing. Whether Murder will do the same for Nottingham is another matter.

"It is important to show this crime for what it often is, a vicious outburst of malicious energy and not
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

2012 Revelation Perth International Film Festival: Official Lineup

Australia’s Revelation Perth International Film Festival will be holding it’s explosive 15th annual edition on July 5-15 with one of it’s most jam-packed lineups yet.

One of the most special events that Revelation will be holding is July 14‘s retrospective of the films of Jeff Keen, the pioneering British underground filmmaker who very sadly just passed away on June 21. Keen’s work has been having a major resurgence lately and Revelation is the latest organization to so boldly feature his breathtaking experimental film work, from classics like 1967′s Marvo Movie to modern films like Artwar (1993) and Joy Thru Film (2000). This is absolutely an event not to be missed.

Another staggering event this year is a very special live presentation of Crispin Hellion Glover‘s notorious underground films What Is It? and It Is Fine! Everything Is Fine. (Click film titles for Bad Lit reviews!) These very
See full article at Underground Film Journal »

Elizabeth Banks Asks 'What's The Matter With Margie?' With Alan Ball, 'The Angriest Man In Brooklyn' Finds A Few Friends & More

Even though he scripted "American Beauty" for Sam Mendes before his two successful television shows "Six Feet Under" and "True Blood," Alan Ball has only returned to the silver screen for little-seen directorial debut "Towelhead." Last year, though, brought news that Emmy and Oscar winning writer-director (hello Egot?) was lining up a return with a dark comedy for Paramount.

While Ball has now stepped away from the director's chair for "True Blood" protégé and television vet Daniel Minahan (who came close to landing the job directing "Thor 2,") he's now found his leading lady for film in the form of the versatile Elizabeth Banks. The actress will play a stepped-on office-worker who after years of abuse snaps and resorts to murderous revenge. Lensing will begin early next year in L.A. soon after Banks team with Charlie Kaufman for his highly anticipated film industry musical satire, "Frank Or Francis." [ThompsonOnHollywood]

Robin Williams,
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