The Lawless (1950) - News Poster

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San Sebastian to pay tribute to Joseph Losey by Amber Wilkinson - 2017-02-08 12:02:18

San Sebastian will pay tribute to the filmmaker Photo: Courtesy of San Sebastian Film Festival San Sebastian Film Festival has announced it will pay tribute to Us filmmaker Joseph Losey during its 2017 edition.

The director, who moved to Britain after suffering fallout from the Hollywood witch hunt, became a leading figure in European independent film. His work includes The Servant, Accident and The Go-Between.

His work is divided into three periods: his early period in North American film until the early Fifties, the prestige he achieved in the UK of the Sixties and Seventies and a later, more itinerant stage when he worked for Italian, French and Spanish production.

He made his feature debut in 1948 with The Boy With Green Hair, a parable against war, totalitarianism and intransigence towards difference, produced by Rko. He went on to direct a series of film noirs – The Lawless (1950), The Prowler (1951) and The Big Night
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

I Want to Live!

It’s a powerful plea against the death penalty, but also an Oscar bid for a fiery actress. And don’t forget the cool jazz music score. On top of this Robert Wise adds a formerly- taboo sequence, a realistic depiction of an execution in the gas chamber. Of such things were gritty, hard-hitting reputations made.

I Want to Live!

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1958 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 121 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring Susan Hayward, Simon Oakland, Theodore Bikel, Virginia Vincent, Wesley Lau, Philip Coolidge.

Cinematography Lionel Lindon

Original Music Johnny Mandel

Written by Nelson Gidding, Don M. Mankiewicz

Produced by Walter Wanger (for Joseph Mankiewicz)

Directed by Robert Wise

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Robert Wise’s I Want to Live! from 1958 is a Can of Worms movie… start discussing its subject matter, and opinions immediately become a stumbling block. So I’ll
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Chase

Horton Foote, Lillian Hellman and Arthur Penn's All-Star vision of an Ugly America found few friends in 1965; now its overstated scenes of social injustice and violence are daily events. Marlon Brando leads a terrific cast -- Robert Redford, Jane Fonda, Angie Dickinson, Robert Duvall! -- to endure the worst Saturday ever to hit one cursed Texas township. The Chase (1966) Blu-ray Twilight Time 1966 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 134 min. / Street Date October 11, 2016 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store / 29.95 Starring Marlon Brando, Jane Fonda, Robert Redford, E.G. Marshall, Angie Dickinson, Janice Rule, Miriam Hopkins, Martha Hyer, Richard Bradford, Robert Duvall, James Fox, Diana Hyland, Henry Hull, Jocelyn Brando, Clifton James, Steve Ihnat Cinematography Joseph Lashelle Production Designer Richard Day Art Direction Robert Luthardt Film Editor Gene Milford Original Music John Barry Written by Lillian Hellman from the novel by Horton Foote Produced by Sam Spiegel Directed by Arthur Penn

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Modesty Blaise

Joseph Losey doesn't normally make trendy, lighthearted genre films, and in this SuperSpy epic we find out why -- an impressive production and great music don't compensate for a lack of pace and dynamism, not to mention a narrow sense of humor. Yet it's a lounge classic, and a perverse favorite of spy movie fans. Modesty Blaise Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1966 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 119 min. / Street Date August 23, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Monica Vitti, Terence Stamp, Dirk Bogarde, Harry Andrews, Michael Craig, Clive Revill, Alexander Knox, Rossella Falk, Scilla Gabel, Tina Marquand Cinematography Jack Hildyard Production Designer Richard MacDonald, Jack Shampan Film Editor Reginald Beck Original Music John Dankworth Written by Evan Jones from a novel by Peter O'Donnell and a comic strip by Jim Holdaway Produced by Joseph Janni Directed by Joseph Losey

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

When I first reviewed a DVD of Modesty Blaise fourteen years ago,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Try and Get Me!

This noir hits with the force of a blast furnace -- Cy Endfield's wrenching tale of social neglect and injustice will tie your stomach in knots. Sound like fun? An unemployed man turns to crime and reaps a whirlwind of disproportionate retribution. It's surely the most powerful of all filmic accusations thrown at the American status quo. Try and Get Me! Blu-ray Olive Films 1950 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 92 min. / Street Date April 19, 2016 / The Sound of Fury / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95 Starring Frank Lovejoy, Kathleen Ryan, Richard Carlson, Lloyd Bridges, Katherine Locke, Adele Jergens, Art Smith, Renzo Cesana, Irene Vernon, Cliff Clark, Donald Smelick, Joe E. Ross. Cinematography Guy Roe Production Design Perry Ferguson Film Editor George Amy Original Music Hugo Friedhofer Written by Jo Pagano from his novel The Condemned Produced by Robert Stillman Directed by Cyril Endfield

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Socially conscious 'issue' movies are not all made equal.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blue Denim

Hollywood tackles the big issues! This adapted play about an unwanted teen pregnancy is actually quite good, thanks to fine performances by Carol Lynley and Brandon De Wilde, who convince as cherubic high schoolers 'too young to know the score.' And hey, the teen trauma is set to an intense music score by Bernard Herrmann. Blue Denim 20th Century Fox Cinema Archives 1959 / B&W / 2:35 widescreen / 89 min. / Street Date March 16, 2016 / available through Amazon / 19.98 Starring Carol Lynley, Brandon De Wilde, Macdonald Carey, Marsha Hunt, Warren Berlinger, Vaughn Taylor, Roberta Shore, Malcolm Atterbury, Anthony J. Corso, Gregg Martell, William Schallert. Cinematography Leo Tover Film Editor William Reynolds, George Leggewie Original Music Bernard Herrmann Written by Edith Sommer, Philip Dunne from the play by James Leo Herlihy and William Noble Produced by Charles Brackett Directed by Philip Dunne

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Sex education today is erratic, with no established standard, but
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Figures in a Landscape

Where was Leonard Pinth Garnell when we needed him?  Joseph Losey is often accused of pretension but in this case he may be guilty. Robert Shaw and Malcolm McDowell are escapees scrambling across a rocky terrain, pursued by a helicopter that seems satisfied to just harass them. Keeping the audience in the dark doesn't reap any dramatic or thematic benefit that I can see. Figures in a Landscape Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1970 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 110 min. / Street Date January 12, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Robert Shaw, Malcolm McDowell, Roger Lloyd Pack, Pamela Brown. Cinematography Henri Alekan, Peter Suschitzky, Guy Tabary Film Editor Reginald Beck Art Direction Ted Tester Original Music Richard Rodney Bennett Written by Robert Shaw from the novel by Barry England Produced by John Kohn Directed by Joseph Losey

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Joseph Losey is a gold mine for film criticism but a real problem for simple film reviewing.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

19 Most Laughably Unfair Video Game Bosses Of All Time

Konami

Calling any aspect of a video game cheap is always a touchy subject, especially on the wide, wide world of the internet. So often will people misinterpret the views of others as an excuse for being crap at video games, you almost feel like you need to blurt out a disclaimer through a foghorn that you do actually have a reason for such a view.

The dividing line between fair and unfair is a thin one, don’t get me wrong – but contrary to popular belief, it is possible for an aspect of a video game to be objectively bad. There are just more bases to cover in gaming than in other forms of entertainment.

Is a boss fight unfair because it breaks its own rules? Is it intentionally designed in such a way, or is it the result of some very shoddy programming? There are so many different
See full article at Obsessed with Film »

Upcoming Hurricane Sandy Film Continues Hollywood's Preoccupation with Technology's Place in Our Lives

Upcoming Hurricane Sandy Film Continues Hollywood's Preoccupation with Technology's Place in Our Lives
After Hurricane Sandy made landfall in October 2012, I became one of the residents of Manhattan’s newest neighborhood: SoPo, the wonderfully NYC-esque portmanteau for South of Power. The dividing line was 39th Street, and everyone south of that on the island was without electricity for several days. I stuck it out for a day or two, and I can still remember going to bed super early (I think it was 8 or 9 o'clock at night), because once the sun has gone down, there really isn’t much to do when you have no power, no Internet and no cell service. This month, a new film about the power outage called "3rd Street Blackout" is set to begin production in New York. Helmed by first-time directors Negin Farsad and Jeremy Redleaf, the film focuses on a tech-obsessed couple who find themselves suddenly—one might even say forcibly—unplugged after Sandy. "We really
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Blu-ray, DVD Release: Stranger on the Prowl

Blu-ray & DVD Release Date: April 22, 2014

Price: DVD $24.95, Blu-ray $29.95

Studio: Olive Films

Paul Muni stars in 1952's Stranger on the Prowl.

Paul Muni (I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang) stars in the 1952 film noir drama Stranger on the Prowl, which is based on a story by novelist Noël Calef (Elevator to the Gallows).

The film stars Muni as a disillusioned vagrant who accidentally kills a shop owner. While on the lam he befriends a young street urchin (Vittorio Manunta) who suspects the police are after him for stealing milk from the same shop owner. The police pursue the two lost souls through the war-torn streets and buildings of an Italian port city.

Upon its initial American release, Stranger on the Prowl’s credits read: written and directed by Andrea Forzano. In truth Forzano was two people: screenwriter Ben Barzman (Back to Bataan) and director Joseph Losey (The Romantic Englishwoman,
See full article at Disc Dish »

AC Lyles obituary

Veteran film producer and friend to many of Hollywood's stars

The office walls of the film producer AC Lyles, who has died aged 95, were plastered with celebrity photographs. He seemed to know everybody in Hollywood, from presidents and governors to the great names of film, such as Elizabeth Taylor, Bob Hope and Bing Crosby. James Cagney, William Holden and Ronald Reagan were close personal friends.

Lyles worked for the same company, Paramount, for most of his life, starting as a mailroom office boy in 1937, after the studio's head, Adolph Zukor, gave in to his weekly letters begging for a job.

Indeed, he maintained that he had decided on his ninth birthday that he was going to be a producer. At the age of 10, he had a cleaning job at the Paramount cinema in his home town of Jacksonville, Florida, and seeing the silent film Wings, starring Clara Bow, reinforced this aspiration.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Which "World War Z" Scenes Were Changed?

Speaking with scribes Drew Goddard ("The Cabin in the Woods") and Damon Lindelof ("Lost"), The Huffington Post has posted a breakdown of the changes done to this Friday's "World War Z" movie which underwent extensive reshoots to completely retool the third act.

Minor Spoilers Ahead

The dividing line between the original version and the theatrical cut happens when Brad Pitt's character boards a plane on the Jerusalem tarmac to get out of Israel.

As soon as Pitt's character gets onboard is when Goddard and Lindelof's new material takes over. "Jack Reacher" writer/director Chris McQuarrie also was briefly involved to "sharpen" the ending.

The original cut revolved around a large-scale zombie battle in Russia for much of the final forty-five minutes. The new version now in cinemas is contained mostly within a Welsh medical facility.

Other character building scenes were added to earlier parts of the film - two
See full article at Dark Horizons »

Special Features - The Top Five Directors Who Are Getting Progressively Worse

Anghus Houvouras picks his top five five directors whose output is getting progressively worse, and rates their chances of redemption...

Some filmmakers age like fine wine.  Others ferment.  Every filmmaker has an occasional miscue or a film that doesn't live up to expectations.  But there are others who consistently work and yet seem to be spiraling down a slippery descent into mediocrity... or worse.  Here's a list of the top five filmmakers who have seemed to have lost their way.

5. Francis Ford Coppola

It feels like a lifetime since we've seen a Coppola film that is worth the two hour investment.  At one point he was the riskiest, most daring filmmaker in the business.  He took big risks and reaped big rewards.  But then he started turning out junk that barely qualified as mediocre.  It was right around the time he released the family friendly drama Jack with Robin Williams
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

The Details: Mann and the Ear

  • MUBI
As Michael Mann has ventured into digital territory—or, in some cases, into a hybrid of digital and celluloid—there has been an unexpected and unusual compositional focus on the ear. Mann doesn’t so much glamorize the cosmetics of the ear but rather makes it an intractable fact of life in so many of his images. It’s almost always there on the edge of the frame in both dialogue scenes and set pieces, either just barely out of reach of the lens’ focal length or indeed the lone focal point, a stray ear in an expansive frame. Due to Mann’s increasingly regular use of wide-angle lenses at atypical moments—a tendency that cuts across his collaborations with various Dp’s (Dante Spinotti, Dion Beebe, Paul Cameron, Emmanuel Lubezki, Lukas Strebel)—there’s a heightened awareness towards objects in close proximity to the camera (and thus an uncanny
See full article at MUBI »

Watch: Ron Swanson Would Give Up Deep-Dish For The Cubs

  • Aol TV.
Watch: Ron Swanson Would Give Up Deep-Dish For The Cubs
Comedians Nick Offerman and Craig Robinson, best known for their roles of Ron Swanson ("Parks and Recreation") and Darryl Philbin ("The Office") respectively, have entered a appropriately-timed round two of their Cubs vs. Sox debate as party of New Era's latest ad campaign.

Last month, Offerman, a Cubs fan who was born and raised in Illinois and got his comedy start in Chicago, and Robinson, who grew up on the city's South Side and loved the Sox, exchanged barbs about each other's favorite teams while sitting in a fictional Chicago bar called The Dividing Line.

This time around, the two have returned to The Dividing Line to test how far the other would go for their team.

"Would you give up deep-dish pizza for life if it'd guarantee the Cubs will win the World Series?" Robinson asks.

"I could stack up thin crust," Offerman responds in his signature deadpan. "So,
See full article at Aol TV. »

Watch: Cubs Fan Ron Swanson vs. Sox Fan Darryl Philbin

Watch: Cubs Fan Ron Swanson vs. Sox Fan Darryl Philbin
Following in the footsteps of Alec Baldwin and John Krasinski, Nick Offerman and Craig Robinson, best known for their roles of Ron Swanson ("Parks and Recreation") and Darryl Philbin ("The Office"), are taking sides in the long-standing Cubs-Sox rivalry in New Era's new ad campaign.

The first ad in the campaign, posted last week on Funny Or Die, begins with Offerman, a Cubs fan who was born and raised in Illinois and got his comedy start in Chicago, and Robinson, who grew up on the city's South Side and loved the Sox, sitting in a fictional Chicago bar called The Dividing Line.

"How old is Wrigley anyway? Do you even have electricity?" Robinson asks Offerman.

"It's powered by tradition, my friend. Something you wouldn't know about at Mobile Phone Park," Offerman replies.

The ad goes on to reference the "weeds" -- er, ivy -- at Wrigley Field, Chicago-style pizza and
See full article at Huffington Post »

Watch: Cubs Fan Ron Swanson vs. Sox Fan Darryl Philbin

  • Aol TV.
Watch: Cubs Fan Ron Swanson vs. Sox Fan Darryl Philbin
Following in the footsteps of Alec Baldwin and John Krasinski, Nick Offerman and Craig Robinson, best known for their roles of Ron Swanson ("Parks and Recreation") and Darryl Philbin ("The Office"), are taking sides in the long-standing Cubs-Sox rivalry in New Era's new ad campaign.

The first ad in the campaign, posted last week on Funny Or Die, begins with Offerman, a Cubs fan who was born and raised in Illinois and got his comedy start in Chicago, and Robinson, who grew up on the city's South Side and loved the Sox, sitting in a fictional Chicago bar called The Dividing Line.

"How old is Wrigley anyway? Do you even have electricity?" Robinson asks Offerman.

"It's powered by tradition, my friend. Something you wouldn't know about at Mobile Phone Park," Offerman replies.

The ad goes on to reference the "weeds" -- er, ivy -- at Wrigley Field, Chicago-style pizza and
See full article at Aol TV. »

DVD Release: The Lawless

DVD Release Date: May 22, 2012

Price: DVD $24.95

Studio: Olive Films

The classic 1950 film drama The Lawless starring Macdonald Carey (The Great Missouri Raid) and Gail Russell (Angel and the Badman) takes on the issues of immigrant workers and racial discrimination, subjects that were rarely covered in mainstream movies at that time.

Carey plays a crusading newspaperman who seemingly is the only person willing to champion the rights of a group of oppressed Mexican-American fruit-pickers, just he tries to stop a lynch mob’s manhunt of a Latino fugitive accused of fomenting a riot.

Tackling a controversial issue in an honest, no-nonsense fashion, director Joseph Losey (The Romantic Englishwoman), helming his second feature, was later blacklisted in the United States and moved to Europe where he made the remainder of his films, mostly in the United Kingdom.

The Lawless also stars John Sands, Lee Patrick, John Hoyt and Lalo Rios.

The film
See full article at Disc Dish »

Ali Lohan too thin? Some say yes

The dividing line between too thin and just right for women is a slippery slope. Throughout the history of modern women's fashion, models have been criticized for being too thin (Twiggy in the 1960s, Kate Moss in the 1980s). In a world where a Us size 8 is considered too large, designers still refuse to show their collections on average female builds. Now the sister of Lindsay Lohan, who somehow snagged a career as a fashion model, is under scrutiny for her "gaunt" frame according to the UK's Daily Mail. Ali Lohan appears "frighteningly thin" in Oahu, Hawaii, and "almost disappeared" as she turned sideways in a local parking lot, according to the UK paper. Ali has also denied
See full article at Monsters and Critics »

It's Pippa Middleton's birthday: 5 fun facts about the royal-sister-in-law

  • Pop2it
On Tuesday (Sept. 6) royal sis-in-law Pippa Middleton celebrates her 28th birthday. In honor of the woman who has become something of a celebrity in her own right since her sister, Kate Middleton, married into the British royal family, we've compiled this list of Pippa trivia. They're perfect little factoids for dropping into casual cocktail party talk:

1. Pippa's parents, Carole and Michael Middleton, are former British Airways employees who made millions launching their own mail order party bag business. Pippa currently works for the company two days a week.

2. In 2008, well before her current celebrity flare-up, Britain's Tatler magazine named Pippa "the Number 1 Society Singleton."

3. The dividing line down the center of the Middleton family's coat of arms (created in 2011) is a pun on the family's name "Middle-ton." The three acorns on the shield represent the three Middleton children.

4. At school, Pippa was nicknamed "Panface," according to the London Evening Standard,
See full article at Pop2it »
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