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Alief Picks Up Spanish Drama ‘Isaac’ (Exclusive)

Alief Picks Up Spanish Drama ‘Isaac’ (Exclusive)
London and Tblisi-based Alief has picked up worldwide rights for Ángeles Hernández and David Matamorros’ Spanish relationship drama “Isaac.” Variety has obtained exclusive access to the trailer.

The film is based on the Spanish play “El día que nació Isaac” by Antonio Hernández Centeno, who is also known for his work on such Spanish series as Amazon’s “Caronte” and Netflix’s “Unauthorized Living.”

Described as “a quirky Dogma 95-style story of love and gender fluidity,” “Isaac” focuses on two old friends, Denis and Nacho, who meet again years after having had an intense relationship as teenagers. Now in relationships with their respective partners, the two couples grow close and end up fulfilling each other’s needs.

Hernández and Matamorros co-directed the pic and produced via their Barcelona-based Mr. Miyagi Films.

Toplining the cast are Ivan Sanchez and Pepe Ocio, both of whom currently star in hit Netflix shows “You Cannot Hide” and “High Seas,
See full article at Variety »

What Netflix's The Platform tells us about humanity in the coronavirus era

We’re appalled when those ‘above’ us don’t share - but there’s always somebody below, too, says director Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia

Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverage

When Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia began shooting his latest film in Bilbao almost two years ago, the Spanish director felt the themes of his low-budget, dystopian horror feature would be sufficiently universal to resonate with audiences around the world. Today, however, many are claiming that El Hoyo – known in English as The Platform – is the perfect parable for life in the time of the coronavirus and a visceral investigation of how a crisis can expose not only the stratification of human society but also the immutable strands of selfishness coded into our DNA.

The parallels are certainly not hard to find. The Platform is set in a forbidding “vertical self-management centre” – a soaring series of concrete cells stacked one on top of the other,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

What Netflix's The Platform tells us about humanity in the coronavirus era

We’re appalled when those ‘above’ us don’t share - but there’s always somebody below, too, says director Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia

Coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverage

When Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia began shooting his latest film in Bilbao almost two years ago, the Spanish director felt the themes of his low-budget, dystopian horror feature would be sufficiently universal to resonate with audiences around the world. Today, however, many are claiming that El Hoyo – known in English as The Platform – is the perfect parable for life in the time of the coronavirus and a visceral investigation of how a crisis can expose not only the stratification of human society but also the immutable strands of selfishness coded into our DNA.

The parallels are certainly not hard to find. The Platform is set in a forbidding “vertical self-management centre” – a soaring series of concrete cells stacked one on top of the other,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

How Xyz Films is shifting gears as coronavirus pandemic disrupts Hollywood

How Xyz Films is shifting gears as coronavirus pandemic disrupts Hollywood
“The strategy is bandwidth expansion.”

Faced with industry-wide disruption amid the coronavirus pandemic, Los Angeles-based producer-financier-sales agent Xyz Films has quickly shifted its focus to building an expanded sales roster for buyers whose pipelines have taken a hit and are urgently in need of product.

Partners Nate Bolotin, Nick Spicer and Aram Tertzakian, head of international acquisitions Todd Brown, and president of international sales and distribution Tatyana Joffe are supplementing sales on the existing slate by sourcing completed films or projects in post from their extensive network of global content creators.

It is an evolving ecosystem that has helped cement
See full article at ScreenDaily »

The First Word Podcast - 'Vivarium' & 'The Platform' Sci-Fi, feat. John Bleasdale

The First Word Podcast - 'Vivarium' & 'The Platform' Sci-Fi, feat. John Bleasdale
"There are three kinds of people: the ones above, the ones below, and the ones who fall." On this episode of The First Word podcast we reconnect for a discussion about two small scale, contained sci-fi films now available to watch: Vivarium, directed by Lorcan Finnegan, starring Jesse Eisenberg & Imogen Poots; and also The Platform (aka El Hoyo in Spanish), directed by Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia, starring Ivan Massagué & Zorion Eguileor. Both worth watching. Friends Alex Billington (@firstshowing) and Mike Eisenberg (@Eisentower30) team up to bring you a podcast providing in-depth discussion, analysis, and interviews about the latest movies, and some old ones too. For this chat, we're joined by film writer John Bleasdale as our guest (he also joined us for our episode on James Gray's Ad Astra last year). Listen to our discussion. Download or listen to The First Word podcast episode #32 below - hosted by Podbean. Subscribe to
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Need to Talk About The Platform's Bizarre Ending? Let's Break Down What It All Means

  • Popsugar
Need to Talk About The Platform's Bizarre Ending? Let's Break Down What It All Means
Watching The Platform on Netflix might just fill the Parasite-shaped hole in your heart, especially as you seek a smart distraction these days. Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia's gritty Spanish social thriller invites us into a facility where a food spread on a platform descends a tower. Cellmates at the top get first dibs on the menu while those below sustain on their scraps. The film is a mind twister for sure, especially towards its wildly metaphorical conclusion. Here's a breakdown of Goreng's revolution in The Platform's ending, no panna cotta guaranteed.

The Platform's Premise

Much like Parasite, the visual hierarchy of capitalism is obvious here: those at the top of the tower get more access to food. They eat with abandon, not thinking about how feasting would affect those below. This environment pits the poor against each other. The impoverished either starve or become violent, some even eating their fellow inmates Donner Party style.
See full article at Popsugar »

The Platform Review

  • HeyUGuys
The Platform Review
Debut director Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia’s The Platform (El Hoyo) makes no apology for its anti-capitalist stance, stark visuals and social metaphors, which in today’s coronavirus era make for very sober and self-reflective viewing. It highlights people’s greed and selfishness in desperate and restrictive circumstances and ironically revolves around food. Indeed it is highly topical, with food stockpiling from stores set against messages on social media about “being kind” and thoughtful.

Much like a cross between Peter Greenaway’s The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover with its lavish cooking scenes at the start that have a whiff of malaise about them with their ominous carcasses on display, the decadent and destructive nature of Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise, and the slow-burn dawning of eternal entrapment within four walls like Lenny Abrahamson’s Room and Vincenzo Natali’s Cube, The Platform is instantly designed to unsettle, before the characters have fathomed their situation.
See full article at HeyUGuys »

‘The Platform’ Director’s Ending Explanation Is as Intriguing as the Movie

‘The Platform’ Director’s Ending Explanation Is as Intriguing as the Movie
We shared the (mostly) non-spoiler portion of our e-mail interview with The Platform director Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia yesterday, but now it's time to get into those burning spoiler-heavy questions we sent his way. With that being said, do not read this article if you haven't seen The Platform on Netflix yet! The movie concludes with Goreng (Ivan Massagué) teaming up with his new cellmate, Baharat (Emilio Buale), to ride the platform down from Floor 6 to ensure that everyone below gets a portion of food. Eventually they hit a point where no one is alive …
See full article at Collider.com »

10 Dystopian Thrillers To Watch After Netflix’s The Platform

10 Dystopian Thrillers To Watch After Netflix’s The Platform
While the whole world continues to practice social distancing, many viewers by have now come across the Spanish-language sci-fi film The Platform on Netflix. Having made its premiere at the 2019 Toronto International Film Festival — where it won the People’s Choice Award for Midnight Madness — the dystopian thriller directed by Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia managed to seal a worldwide deal with the streaming giant. Throughout The Platform’s 94-minute runtime, the audience witnesses the survival of the film’s protagonist, Goreng, (portrayed by Iván Massagué) as he tries to navigate “The Pit”, a large, tower-style prison in which inmates are fed via a large platform housing an opulent feast.

Related: 10 Haunting Dystopian Dramas That Will Keep You Up At Night

When he soon realizes individuals at the top are taking more than their fair share, leaving nothing for the prisoners at the bottom of the building, Goreng sets out on a mission to change the unjust system.
See full article at Screen Rant »

Netflix’s New Horror Movie The Platform Has Viewers Losing Their Minds

Netflix’s New Horror Movie The Platform Has Viewers Losing Their Minds
The innate beauty of Netflix lies in its vast online archives of binge-worthy entertainment. Just sit back, click a few buttons and boom, your next viewing experience is ready and waiting.

And in this digitized world of online streaming, it doesn’t take long for something to become an overnight success. Think of the Netflix phenom Stranger Things or Sex Education – two remarkably well-crafted TV shows that blew up thanks, in part, to word of mouth.

Fast forward to March 2020, and it seems we may have our next viral hit in the form of The Platform, a Spanish horror-thriller set in a dark, dystopian future where the world’s criminals are locked away in vertical prisons. In our review, we awarded Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia’s grim and gory picture with four stars, deeming it to be a “multi-tiered assembly of tension, terror and terrible imaginings that, in cake form, would be
See full article at We Got This Covered »

7 of the best movies and series streaming right now

7 of the best movies and series streaming right now
There are many streaming platforms to source movies old and new, but with many to choose from, how does one sort the good from the bad. Well, over the past few days, we’ve been scouring the likes of Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and the others to present some recommendations. Here is what we’ve come up with.

Tiger King – Netflix – Available now

We’ll kick off with an interesting new documentary series that, one the surface, seems to be an original series about people that keep exotic animals. However, this remarkable seven-episode series is one of the most compelling, engrossing and, in paces, shocking documentaries of the year. With each episode running for just under an hour, the series focusses on a number of people, all connected, who keep the likes of tigers, lions, etc. in various locations across the United States. Tiger King primarily centers on Joe Exotic,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

The Platform Review

The Platform Review
You can add Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia’s The Platform to the universe’s ever-growing list of directorial debuts that showcase anything but novice skill sets. As Bong Joon-ho’s Snowpiercer and Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise so exquisitely pull the curtain back on humanity’s cruelest impulses, Urrutia embraces dystopian monstrosity through elementary necessities. Homo sapiens are courteous beings when benefits are personal and stakes are lowest, but thrust into survival desperation? Writers David Desola and Pedro Rivero obscure mealtime fulfillment with selfishness, vulgarity, brutality, and – most importantly – a suggestion that your neighbors would rip one’s heart out if it meant another day alive. Urrutia, fiercely, is an architect of horrific immorality with the calmest demeanor.

In an alternate future, everyman Goreng (Ivan Massagué) enrolls himself in a research project with vague descriptions. Isolation is promised, he’s allowed one item (a Don Quixote novel), and he’ll be sharing quarters with an unnamed companion.
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Netflix’s ‘The Platform’ Is Certain to Be One of the Best Horror Movies of 2020 | Review

Netflix’s ‘The Platform’ Is Certain to Be One of the Best Horror Movies of 2020 | Review
Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia makes his feature directorial debut with an astoundingly creative and well crafted film. The Platform is a must-see feat of production design, score, performance, and high-concept execution that will likely leave your stomach extremely unsettled - and in this movie’s case, that’s a compliment. The movie stars Ivan Massagué as Goreng, a man who voluntarily agrees to serve six months in The Hole in exchange for an accredited diploma. The facility is a prison of sorts that’s structured vertically. Two inmates call each floor home for exactly 30 days. At the end of …
See full article at Collider.com »

‘The Platform’ Review: Netflix Horror Movie Flips ‘Cube’ Into Cannibalistic Allegory for Capitalism

‘The Platform’ Review: Netflix Horror Movie Flips ‘Cube’ Into Cannibalistic Allegory for Capitalism
. Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia’s “The Platform” is not a subtle film. But these are unsubtle times, with unsubtle problems, and the most alarming thing about this grimly affecting Spanish allegory — which literalizes capitalism’s dehumanizing verticality with twice the gross-out terror of “Parasite,” and almost half of that masterpiece’s furious grace — is that it sometimes doesn’t seem like an allegory at all.

Like “Cube,” “Saw,” and even “The Exterminating Angel” before it, “The Platform” is the sort of (largely) single-location horror movie that’s defined by its premise. Somewhere in the not-so-distant-future — or perhaps a Camus-esque alternate version of now — hundreds of people are trapped in a narrow cement skyscraper that has more levels than any of the prisoners housed there could ever hope to count. The company that owns the place has branded it a “Vertical Self-Management Center,” but its occupants refer to it only as “The Pit,
See full article at Indiewire »

The Platform Trailer: Tiff Midnight Madness Winner Comes to Netflix this Month

The Platform Trailer: Tiff Midnight Madness Winner Comes to Netflix this Month
If you were looking for a bit more of a genre bite with High-Rise, look no further than Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia’s acclaimed debut horror feature The Platform. The People’s Choice winner at Tiff Midnight Madness last year, the film is set in a future dystopia as prisoners are housed in stacked cells as food descends from the upper tiers of life. Netflix picked up the film for their, ahem, platform and now will give it a release in less than two weeks.

Ed Frankl said in our Sitges review, ‘There are three types of people, according to the opening lines of The Platform: those at the top, those at the bottom, and those who fall between them. That class-structure conceit forms the backbone of this ingenious Spanish horror that won the Midnight Madness sidebar at this year’s Toronto Film Festival, a twisted fantasy that aims high with socio-political
See full article at The Film Stage »

‘The Platform’ Trailer: A Vertical Prison Drives a Twisted Allegory About Greed and Gluttony

‘The Platform’ Trailer: A Vertical Prison Drives a Twisted Allegory About Greed and Gluttony
There are countless science fiction films that serve as provocative allegories about society at large, ranging from Fritz Lang’s classic Metropolis all the way back in 1927 to Neill Blomkamp’s District 9 from 2009 and plenty more in between and beyond. Netflix is bringing us another one from Spain by way of director Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia. The […]

The post ‘The Platform’ Trailer: A Vertical Prison Drives a Twisted Allegory About Greed and Gluttony appeared first on /Film.
See full article at Slash Film »

Intense New Trailer for Acclaimed Conceptual Horror 'The Platform'

Intense New Trailer for Acclaimed Conceptual Horror 'The Platform'
"Going down is a suicide." Netflix has unveiled an official Us trailer for the highly acclaimed, instant classic Spanish horror film The Platform, the feature directorial debut of filmmaker Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia. This film won awards at tons of major genre festivals last year, including the Audience Award at Tiff, Best Film & Audience Award at Sitges, and Best Special Effects at the Goya Awards (Spain's Oscars). The conceptual social commentary film is set entirely in a "vertical prison." There is one cell per level. Two people per cell. And only one food platform and two minutes per day to feed them all, going from top to bottom. An endless nightmare trapped in "The Pit." I saw this at Sitges last year and raved about it, saying it's "a thrilling and rousing film that deserves our attention." The Platform stars Ivan Massagué, Zorion Eguileor, Antonia San Juan, Emilio Buale, Alexandra Masangkay, & Zihara Llana.
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

Trailer for ‘The Platform’ – a new Netflix film set inside a vertical prison!

Trailer for ‘The Platform’ – a new Netflix film set inside a vertical prison!
Netflix/YouTube

We’ve managed to get our hands on the trailer for an upcoming Netflix film The Platform, a movie set within the walls of a vertical prison where inmates are assigned to a level and forced to ration food from a platform that moves between the floors. Enough, we’re in.

The Spanish-language satirical science fiction is directed by Galder Gaztelu-Urrutia debuted at last year’s Toronto International Film Festival, and although it has already had a release in its homeland, Spain, and a couple of other countries (Hong Kong from today) it will arrive on Netflix in some territories in just a couple of weeks.

Synopsis: In a prison where inmates on high floors eat better than those below, who get the scant scraps, one man tries to effect change so everyone gets enough.

Some Netflix regions get this on 20th March. Here’s the trailer.

The
See full article at The Hollywood News »

‘Pain and Glory,’ ‘While at War,’ ‘’Endless Trench’ Lead Goya Nominations

  • Variety
‘Pain and Glory,’ ‘While at War,’ ‘’Endless Trench’ Lead Goya Nominations
Pedro Almodóvar’s “Pain and Glory” will go head-to-head with two other big Spanish films – Alejandro Amenábar’s “While at War” and “The Endless Trench,” from Aitor Aguirre, Jon Garaño and José Mari Goenaga – at Spain’s 34th Goya Academy Awards, to be held Jan. 25 in Malaga.

Pain and Glory” garnered 16 nominations,” “While at War” 17 and “The Endless Trench” 15.

Though most pundits would put “Pain and Glory” as the frontrunner, the outcome is difficult to predict. World-premiering in Spain before competing in Cannes, where Antonio Banderas won the best actor prize, “Pain and Glory” was reckoned by Spanish critics to be Almodóvar’s best film in a decade.

But ever since the screenplay for Luis Buñuel’s “Viridiana,” which went on to win the Palme d’Or, was written off in Spain as nonsense, the Spanish industry has steadfastly refused to kowtow to internationally acclaimed directors or indeed talent.

Screening at Ventana Sur,
See full article at Variety »

Macao Film Festival reveals full line-up for 2019 edition

  • ScreenDaily
The New Chinese Cinema section returns for the second year.

The 4th International Film Festival & Awards Macao has unveiled its 2019 programme, including the return of the New Chinese Cinema section with a jury headed by Romanian filmmaker Cristian Mungiu.

Mungiu will oversee a five-person jury watching six films from Chinese-speaking territories. His jury consists of BFI London Film Festival artistic director Tricia Tuttle; former Sffilm (San Francisco Film) executive director Noah Cowan; and filmmakers Kirsten Tan from Singapore and Qiu Yang from China.

Scroll down for the line-up

The films in the section include Anthony Chen’s Wet Season, which
See full article at ScreenDaily »
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