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Rotterdam Film Festival to host Edgar Pêra retrospective

Includes three world and international premieres.

International Film Festival Rotterdam (Iffr) has announced Portuguese filmmaker Edgar Pêra as the subject of the retrospective at its 48th edition (January 23 – February 3).

The retrospective will feature 24 titles by the director, including three world and international premieres, as well as Pêra’s most significant works and several smaller films.

Amongst the premieres is the international bow of Lovecraftland, a 3D concert film inspired by the writing and legacy of author H.P. Lovecraft. A live score will be provided by Portuguese musician Randolph Carter.

Also having its international premiere is Magnetick Pathways (Caminhos Magnéticos), exploring
See full article at ScreenDaily »

Today is Peter Cushing’s 103rd Birthday! Here Are His Ten Best Roles

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, Michael Haffner, Sam Moffitt, and Tom Stockman

Peter Cushing, born on this day in 1913, was one of the most respected and important actors in the horror and fantasy film genres. To his many fans, the British star, who died in 1994, was known as ‘The Gentle Man of Horror’ and is recognized for his work with Hammer Films which began in the late 1950’s, but he had numerous memorable roles outside of Hammer. A topnotch actor who was able to deliver superb performances on a consistent basis, Peter Cushing also had range. He could play both the hero and the villain with ease.

Here, according to We Are Movie Geeks, are Peter Cushing’s ten best roles:

Dr. Maitland

During the 1960s, Amicus Studios had a knack for borrowing from the pool of Hammer Studios actors and filmmakers to make their own Hammer-inspired films. While
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Don’T Bother To Knock (1952)

The icon-establishing performances Marilyn Monroe gave in Howard HawksGentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) and in Billy Wilder’s Some Like It Hot (1959) are ones for the ages, touchstone works that endure because of the undeniable comic energy and desperation that sparked them from within even as the ravenous public became ever more enraptured by the surface of Monroe’s seductive image of beauty and glamour. Several generations now probably know her only from these films, or perhaps 1955’s The Seven-Year Itch, a more famous probably for the skirt-swirling pose it generated than anything in the movie itself, one of director Wilder’s sourest pictures, or her final completed film, The Misfits (1961), directed by John Huston, written by Arthur Miller and costarring Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift.

But in Don’t Bother to Knock (1952) she delivers a powerful dramatic performance as Nell, a psychologically devastated, delusional, perhaps psychotic young woman apparently on
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Horror Classics: Four Chilling Movies from Hammer Films

Warners answers the call for Hammer horror with four nifty thrillers starring the great Peter Cushing and Christopher Lee. The transfers are immaculate -- Technicolor was never richer than this. The only drawback is that Chris Lee's Dracula has so few lines of dialogue.  On hi-def, Cushing's Frankenstein movie is a major re-discovery as well. Horror Classics: Four Chilling Movies from Hammer Films Blu-ray The Mummy, Dracula has Risen from the Grave, Frankenstein Must Be Destroyed, Taste the Blood of Dracula Warner Home Video 1959-1970 / Color / 1:66 - 1:78 widescreen / 376 min. / Street Date October 6, 2015 / 54.96 Starring Peter Cushing, Christopher Lee, Yvonne Furneaux, George Pastell, Michael Ripper; Christopher Lee, Rupert Davies, Veronica Carlson, Barbara Ewing, Barry Andrews, Ewan Hooper, Michael Ripper; Peter Cushing, Veronica Carlson, Freddie Jones, Simon Ward, Thorley Walters, Maxine Audley; Christopher Lee, Geoffrey Keen, Linda Hayden, Isla Blair, John Carson, Ralph Bates, Roy Kinnear. <Cinematography Jack Asher; Arthur Grant; Arthur Grant; Arthur Grant.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Brian Clemens: an appreciation of The Avengers and The Professionals writer

We pay tribute to Brian Clemens, a screenwriter and producer whose work lit up 1970s cult TV and beyond...

Brian Clemens, who died earlier this week aged 83, was a highly respected screenwriter and producer both for TV and Film. He will chiefly be remembered for his work on The Avengers, The New Avengers and The Professionals but his credits were numerous and encapsulated a real golden age of cult, escapist television from the 1950s onwards.

Clemens was born in Croydon in July 1931. He spent his National Service as a Weapons Training Instructor. After spending time as a copywriter, he established himself as a scriptwriter - sometimes using the pseudonym "Tony O'Grady" - O'Grady being his mother's maiden name. He received his first commission from the BBC at the age of 24 - a thriller called Valid For Single Journey Only. He went on to write for many of the big TV
See full article at Den of Geek »

Brian Clemens, Writer/Producer/Director, Dead At Age 83; TV Classics "Danger Man", "The Avengers" And "The Persuaders" Among His Credits

  • CinemaRetro
Screenwriter and producer Brian Clemens has passed away at age 83 in his native England. Clemens wrote scripts for some of the most revered British television programs of the 1960s and 1970s including "Danger Man" (aka "Secret Agent"), "The Avengers", "The Persuaders", "The Professionals",  "The Baron" and "The New Avengers".  Clemens also produced or executive produced several of the aforementioned shows.  He also contributed single episode scripts for other popular shows including "Highlander", "The Protectors" and "Remington Steele".  Clemens wrote numerous scripts for "Father Dowling Mysteries" and three "Perry Mason" TV movies in the early 1990s. A prolific writer, he also  wrote screenplays for feature films beginning in the 1950s. His credits include "Station Six Sahara", "The Corrupt Ones" (aka "The Peking Medallion"), "See No Evil", "The Golden Voyage of Sinbad", Disney's "The Watcher in the Woods", "Highlander II: The Quickening" and the Hammer horror film "Captain Kronos: Vampire Hunter
See full article at CinemaRetro »

The Avengers and The Professionals writer Brian Clemens dies, aged 83

TV writer and producer Brian Clemens has died, aged 83.

Clemens was perhaps best known for being responsible for The Avengers, New Avengers and The Professionals.

Honoured by the Queen in 2010 for services to broadcasting and drama, he passed away on Saturday (January 10), his family confirmed.

He also wrote for various TV series, including The Baron, The Persuaders, The Protectors, Danger Man, The Invisible Man and Bergerac.

His production companies created The New Avengers and The Professionals, while he also wrote for several Us shows including Remington Steele, Perry Mason and Highlander.

Clemens also wrote and produced for Hammer Films, while also co-writing the story for Highlander II: The Quickening.

He was also involved in The Elstree Project, whose spokesman said: "Brian gave his support and time to The Elstree Project and is featured in our documentary film, through clips from the oral history interview he gave to us, as well
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

Top Ten Tuesday: Peter Cushing – His Ten Best Movie Roles

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, Michael Haffner, Sam Moffitt, and Tom Stockman

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Peter Cushing (1913-1994) was one of the most respected and important actors in the horror and fantasy film genres. To his many fans, the British star was known as ‘The Gentle Man of Horror’ and is recognized for his work with Hammer Films which began in the late 1950’s, but he had numerous memorable roles outside of Hammer. A topnotch actor who was able to deliver superb performances on a consistent basis, Peter Cushing also had range. He could play both the hero and the villain with ease.

Super-8 Peter Cushing Movie Madness takes place February 4th at The Way Out Club in St. Louis and will be a great way to celebrate the actor’s career. The event is on February 4th beginning at 8pm. Condensed versions (average length:
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

London Film Memorabilia Convention Hammer & Horror Film Day- London, 9 November

  • CinemaRetro
Hammer and Horror Film Day!

Saturday November the 9th ( 10am – 5pm )

Central Hall Westminster.

Storey’s Gate, Westminster, London SW1H 9Nh

UK’s longest running film fair and convention.

Now in it’s 40th year!

The Convention presents dealers from all over the UK, Europe, Us ,

Canada and South America.

Specialising in rare original film memorabilia and collectables.

Taking place six times a year these are truly unique events for anyone with an interest in films!

With actors and director’s signings, illustrated talks, retrospectives and film screenings taking place through out the day.

Items covering the history of cinema can be found. From the silents to the present.

From rare items of the 1920’s to new releases and the latest heart throb.

Among the many different field of cinema covered at the show is – Classic Hollywood, horror films, sci-fi, the best of British and European cinema as we as cult tv!
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Gilbert Taylor, Star Wars cinematographer, dies aged 99

Taylor worked with some of Hollywood's greats including Alfred Hitchcock, Roman Polanski and George Lucas

The renowned British cinematographer Gilbert Taylor, whose body of work included Star Wars, The Omen and Dr Strangelove, has died.

Taylor passed away at his home on the Isle of Wight aged 99 after a life which saw him credited with some of Hollywood's most acclaimed films.

While his work included Ice Cold in Alex, the Beatles' film A Hard Day's Night and Alfred Hitchcock's Frenzy, he is best known for the first of George Lucas's Star Wars series.

"George avoided all meetings and contact with me from day one," Taylor told American Cinematographer magazine. "So I read the extra-long script many times and made my own decisions as to how I would shoot the picture."

His career in the film industry started in 1929 when he was still a teenager and was taken on
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Steve Forrest obituary

Hollywood actor best known for his starring role as Lieutenant Dan 'Hondo' Harrelson in the 70s cop series S.W.A.T.

Steve Forrest, who has died aged 87, was a product of the Hollywood studio system, then at its tail end in the 1950s. Although MGM had the handsome, rugged 6ft 3in actor under contract for five years, from 1952 to 1957, they gave him few chances to shine. It was only when he left the studio that Forrest got bigger and better parts in feature films – one of his best performances was as the white brother of Elvis Presley, who plays the son of a Native American mother and a Texas rancher father, in Don Siegel's excellent western Flaming Star (1960) – and he was able to start a long and busy career on television.

In fact, it was on the small screen that Forrest would build his fame, notably in S.W.A.T. (1975-
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Steve Forrest obituary

Hollywood actor best known for his starring role as Lieutenant Dan 'Hondo' Harrelson in the 70s cop series S.W.A.T.

Steve Forrest, who has died aged 87, was a product of the Hollywood studio system, then at its tail end in the 1950s. Although MGM had the handsome, rugged 6ft 3in actor under contract for five years, from 1952 to 1957, they gave him few chances to shine. It was only when he left the studio that Forrest got bigger and better parts in feature films – one of his best performances was as the white brother of Elvis Presley, who plays the son of a Native American mother and a Texas rancher father, in Don Siegel's excellent western Flaming Star (1960) – and he was able to start a long and busy career on television.

In fact, it was on the small screen that Forrest would build his fame, notably in S.W.A.T. (1975-
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Actor Steve Forrest Dead At Age 87; Starred In TV Series "The Baron" And "S.W.A.T."

  • CinemaRetro
 

Actor Steve Forrest has passed away at the age of 87. The brother of famed actor Dana Andrews, Forrest had a successful career in films and television. A WWII veteran who fought in the Battle of the Bulge, Forrest was discovered by Gregory Peck and appeared in numerous films including Flaming Star, Spies Like Us, The Longest Day, Heller in Pink Tights, North Dallas Forty and Mommie Dearest. He was also a proficient vocalist and golfer. On TV, Forrest enjoyed his greatest success, starring in the short-lived, but fondly remembered British adventure series The Baron. As the titular character in the 1965 show, Forrest played an American antiques dealer living in London who would secretly undertake dangerous international missions in the service of British Intelligence. Forrest also had the lead role in the 1970s hit TV series S.W.A.T.  For more click here
See full article at CinemaRetro »

R.I.P. Steve Forrest

Veteran actor Steve Forrest, who had more than 100 TV credits including starring on the mid-1970s police actioner S.W.A.T., died May 18 in Thousand Oaks. He was 87. The brother of actor Dana Andrews, Forrest made guest appearances on scores of TV shows and recurred on the original Dallas. He also played Lt. Hondo Harrelson on ABC’s 1975-76 police actioner S.W.A.T. — he had a cameo in the 2003 feature adaptation — and starred as John “The Baron” Mannering on the 1966 Cold War spy drama The Baron, the first color series on UK TV. Forrest, from Texas, was a sergeant in the Army and saw action in the Battle of the Bulge. He later moved to La and graduated from UCLA in 1950 with a theater arts degree. He went on to work as a stagehand at the La Jolla Playhouse, where he was discovered by Hollywood icon Gregory Peck, who cast Forrest in a
See full article at Deadline TV »

Sue Lloyd obituary

Actor known for her roles in The Ipcress File and Crossroads

The actor Sue Lloyd, who has died aged 72, exuded glamour and sophistication on screen in the 1960s, before finding renewed fame two decades later as Barbara Hunter in 714 episodes of the TV soap opera Crossroads. But it took two attempts by the serial's producers to persuade her to join a programme that was roundly abused by the critics.

"My initial reaction was to be a bit sniffy about it," Lloyd recalled in her 1998 autobiography, It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time. "The soap was renowned for its wobbly scenery, bizarre storylines and regular slaughtering by the critics. Why would I, just back from filming [Revenge of] The Pink Panther with Peter Sellers in the south of France and about to embark on the comedy The Upchat Line with John Alderton, want to get involved in a project like that?
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Sue Lloyd obituary

Actor known for her roles in The Ipcress File and Crossroads

The actor Sue Lloyd, who has died aged 72, exuded glamour and sophistication on screen in the 1960s, before finding renewed fame two decades later as Barbara Hunter in 714 episodes of the TV soap opera Crossroads. But it took two attempts by the serial's producers to persuade her to join a programme that was roundly abused by the critics.

"My initial reaction was to be a bit sniffy about it," Lloyd recalled in her 1998 autobiography, It Seemed Like a Good Idea at the Time. "The soap was renowned for its wobbly scenery, bizarre storylines and regular slaughtering by the critics. Why would I, just back from filming [Revenge of] The Pink Panther with Peter Sellers in the south of France and about to embark on the comedy The Upchat Line with John Alderton, want to get involved in a project like that?
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

From old books to big bucks: 8 vintage heroes who deserve a modern revival

With the next Sherlock Holmes movie on the horizon, David looks at a few other literary heroes that deserve a fresh chance on the big screen…

Classic suspense heroes are getting a lot of Hollywood attention at the moment. Sherlock Holmes: A Game Of Shadows will be released in December, and Robert Downey Jr wants to similarly reinvent Perry Mason, while Miss Marple will apparently turn into Jennifer Garner.

Meanwhile, The Saint, as played by James Purefoy, will return to the small-screen in a TV movie called The Saint In New Orleans. With this in mind, here are a few other classic characters that could be similarly adapted.

Sexton Blake

Originally a Holmes pretender, this character evolved into a hybrid of Holmes, James Bond and Indiana Jones, going on to become the most documented fictional character in the history of the English language, with over two thousand stories and novels published.
See full article at Den of Geek »

British Director Roy Ward Baker Dead At 93; "A Night To Remember" And Hammer Horror Films Among His Achievements

  • CinemaRetro
By Lee Pfeiffer

Roy Ward Baker, the esteemed British film director, has died at age 93. Baker was one of the few remaining representatives of the golden age of British filmmaking. He worked in his early years with such giants as Alfred Hitchcock and Carol Reed before embarking on a directing career of his own. He was one of the pioneers in the early use of 3-D in the 1950s and directed Marilyn Monroe in Don't Bother to Knock, a film that greatly boosted her status as a leading lady. Baker was best known for his direction of the 1958 film A Night to Remember starring Kenneth More, Honor Blackman and David McCallum. The low-budget film was shot primarily at Pinewood Studios and depicted the sinking of the Titanic. Many film historians still believe it's the most dramatic and moving depiction of the tragedy ever brought to the screen. He also directed
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Strange Door Co-Star Richard Stapley Dies

British-born actor Richard Stapley began his film career in Hollywood in the late 1940s. He starred as French nobleman Denis de Beaulieu, who becomes a pawn in Charles Laughton’s revenge plot in the 1951 horror thriller The Strange Door, with Boris Karloff as the menacing manservant Voltan.

Stapley was born in Westcliff, Essex, England, on June 20, 1923. He moved to Hollywood in the late 1940s, where he appeared in such films as The Challenge (1948), The Three Musketeers (1948) with Gene Kelly and Lana Turner, Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women (1949) with June Allyson and Elizabeth Taylor, King of the Khyber Rifles (1953), and Jungle Man-Eater (1954), with Johnny Weissmuller as Jungle Jim.

He returned to England in the late 1950s, where he continued his career in films and television under the name Richard Wyler. He starred as Interpol Agent Anthony Smith in the television series Man from Interpol from 1960 to 1961. He also appeared in episodes of The Saint,
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

28 Weeks Later Character Actor Garfield Morgan Dies

Garfield Morgan was a leading British character actor in films and television. He made one of his final screen appearances as an ill-fated elderly farmer in the 2007 zombie horror film 28 Weeks Later.

Morgan was born in Birmingham, England, on April 19, 1931. He attended drama school in Birmingham and began performing on the local stage in the early 1950s. He became a prolific television actor later in the decade, with roles in such series as Out of This World, The Edgar Wallace Mystery Theatre, Undermind, The Saint, The Baron, Out of the Unknown, The Avengers, Department S, My Partner, the Ghost, Paul Temple, and The Persuaders. He was featured as Tao Gan on the ancient Oriental mystery series Judge Dee in 1969, and was the slave master in the 1985 television adaptation of John Christopher’s juvenile sci-fi novel The Tripods: The City of Gold and Lead.

Morgan also appeared in a handful
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »
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